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How do I get rid of sand spurs?

These suckers pop up all over my lawn around this time of year, and I'm not sure how to get rid of them other than constantly pulling them out. Obviously I can't use a broad-leaf herbicide or anything like that. What can I do?

enter image description here

  • Common Sawgrass or Sedge. Too Wet by far if you have this growing. – Fiasco Labs Jun 14 '14 at 1:23
  • Well, it has been raining a lot, but I haven't been watering the yard at all. – user4630 Jun 14 '14 at 1:46
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That is the seedhead of a sedge. You can control them with Dismiss, a post-emergent selective herbicide with the active ingredient sulfentrazone, which is compatible with the following lawn grasses:

  • Zoisiagrass
  • Perennial Ryegrass
  • Tall Fescue
  • Centipedegrass
  • Kentucky Bluegrass
  • Bermudagrass,
  • Creeping Bentgrass
  • Bahia Grass

Or you can use Basagran T/O, another good post-emergent, that has the active ingredient bentazon. This is compatible with the following grasses:

  • Zoisiagrass
  • Perennial Ryegrass
  • Tall Fescue
  • Centipedegrass
  • Kentucky Bluegrass
  • Bermudagrass,
  • Creeping Bentgrass
  • St. Augustinegrass
  • Bahia Grass

Use as directed on the product label. I would suggest not using these if you are near a body of water, to avoid contamination.

You can also use a glufosinate based herbicide, to spot shoot plants in your lawn. This may leave a dead spots in you lawn, but will use much less chemicals.

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    Many sedges make marvellous plants for the waters edge. The ones in the picture are just in the wrong place. – kevinsky Jun 13 '14 at 23:42
  • @kevinsky I agree, and you shouldn't really use herbicides near water anyway. – J. Musser Jun 13 '14 at 23:44
  • And don't overwater... – Fiasco Labs Jun 14 '14 at 1:24
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    @user4630 some wet-foot tolerant sedges are used as ornamental plants for pond edges, or marshes. They are tough, and some species are fairly attractive. – J. Musser Jun 14 '14 at 1:51
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    @user4630 yes, jmusser and I both know sedges as ornamental plants. They are just not in the right place for you. – kevinsky Jun 15 '14 at 2:33

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