4 Improved formatting.
source | link

It certainly looks like the vine form of Poison Ivy. The following information, taken from the About.com site, should help you confirm its identity and deal with it:

These two plants always appears nondescript, making victims wonder what exactly gave them the itchy rash a day or two later. With either species, there is one reliable truism: "Leaflets Three, Let It Be."

Poison Oak and Ivy ALWAYS grow their leaves in groups of three. It doesn’t matter if the leaves look like ivy leaves, oak leaves or have a simple oval shape.

Look for the pattern of three leaflets branching from a single, independent stem.

You’ll find two leaves attached directly to the stalk, opposite each other.

The third leaf will jut from between them on a short stem, forming a distinct T pattern. In dry weather the leaves may droop, making the pattern hard to identify.

HereHere is a link to a leaf diagram that will help you identify it:

http://0.tqn.com/d/walking/1/0/x/g/T_Leaf_Diagram.gif.

And another on how to remove it:

   http://landscaping.about.com/cs/weedsdiseases/a/poison_ivy_3.htmPoison Ivy, Poison Sumac, and Poison Oak Identification.

It certainly looks like the vine form of Poison Ivy. The following information, taken from the About.com site, should help you confirm its identity and deal with it:

These two plants always appears nondescript, making victims wonder what exactly gave them the itchy rash a day or two later. With either species, there is one reliable truism: "Leaflets Three, Let It Be."

Poison Oak and Ivy ALWAYS grow their leaves in groups of three. It doesn’t matter if the leaves look like ivy leaves, oak leaves or have a simple oval shape.

Look for the pattern of three leaflets branching from a single, independent stem.

You’ll find two leaves attached directly to the stalk, opposite each other.

The third leaf will jut from between them on a short stem, forming a distinct T pattern. In dry weather the leaves may droop, making the pattern hard to identify.

Here is a link to a leaf diagram that will help you identify it:

http://0.tqn.com/d/walking/1/0/x/g/T_Leaf_Diagram.gif

And another on how to remove it:

 http://landscaping.about.com/cs/weedsdiseases/a/poison_ivy_3.htm

It certainly looks like the vine form of Poison Ivy. The following information, taken from the About.com site, should help you confirm its identity and deal with it:

These two plants always appears nondescript, making victims wonder what exactly gave them the itchy rash a day or two later. With either species, there is one reliable truism: "Leaflets Three, Let It Be."

Poison Oak and Ivy ALWAYS grow their leaves in groups of three. It doesn’t matter if the leaves look like ivy leaves, oak leaves or have a simple oval shape.

Look for the pattern of three leaflets branching from a single, independent stem.

You’ll find two leaves attached directly to the stalk, opposite each other.

The third leaf will jut from between them on a short stem, forming a distinct T pattern. In dry weather the leaves may droop, making the pattern hard to identify.

Here is a link to a leaf diagram that will help you identify it.

And another on how to remove it:  Poison Ivy, Poison Sumac, and Poison Oak Identification.

3 Link correction
source | link

It certainly looks like the vine form of Poison Ivy. The following information, taken from the About.com site, should help you confirm its identity and deal with it:

These two plants always appears nondescript, making victims wonder what exactly gave them the itchy rash a day or two later. With either species, there is one reliable truism: "Leaflets Three, Let It Be."

Poison Oak and Ivy ALWAYS grow their leaves in groups of three. It doesn’t matter if the leaves look like ivy leaves, oak leaves or have a simple oval shape.

Look for the pattern of three leaflets branching from a single, independent stem.

You’ll find two leaves attached directly to the stalk, opposite each other.

The third leaf will jut from between them on a short stem, forming a distinct T pattern. In dry weather the leaves may droop, making the pattern hard to identify.

Here is a link to a leaf diagram that will help you identify it:

http://0.tqn.com/d/walking/1/0/x/g/T_Leaf_Diagram.gif

And another on how to remove it:

http://landscaping.about.com/od/weedsdiseases/a/poison_oak.htmhttp://landscaping.about.com/cs/weedsdiseases/a/poison_ivy_3.htm

It certainly looks like the vine form of Poison Ivy. The following information, taken from the About.com site, should help you confirm its identity and deal with it:

These two plants always appears nondescript, making victims wonder what exactly gave them the itchy rash a day or two later. With either species, there is one reliable truism: "Leaflets Three, Let It Be."

Poison Oak and Ivy ALWAYS grow their leaves in groups of three. It doesn’t matter if the leaves look like ivy leaves, oak leaves or have a simple oval shape.

Look for the pattern of three leaflets branching from a single, independent stem.

You’ll find two leaves attached directly to the stalk, opposite each other.

The third leaf will jut from between them on a short stem, forming a distinct T pattern. In dry weather the leaves may droop, making the pattern hard to identify.

Here is a link to a leaf diagram that will help you identify it:

http://0.tqn.com/d/walking/1/0/x/g/T_Leaf_Diagram.gif

And another on how to remove it:

http://landscaping.about.com/od/weedsdiseases/a/poison_oak.htm

It certainly looks like the vine form of Poison Ivy. The following information, taken from the About.com site, should help you confirm its identity and deal with it:

These two plants always appears nondescript, making victims wonder what exactly gave them the itchy rash a day or two later. With either species, there is one reliable truism: "Leaflets Three, Let It Be."

Poison Oak and Ivy ALWAYS grow their leaves in groups of three. It doesn’t matter if the leaves look like ivy leaves, oak leaves or have a simple oval shape.

Look for the pattern of three leaflets branching from a single, independent stem.

You’ll find two leaves attached directly to the stalk, opposite each other.

The third leaf will jut from between them on a short stem, forming a distinct T pattern. In dry weather the leaves may droop, making the pattern hard to identify.

Here is a link to a leaf diagram that will help you identify it:

http://0.tqn.com/d/walking/1/0/x/g/T_Leaf_Diagram.gif

And another on how to remove it:

http://landscaping.about.com/cs/weedsdiseases/a/poison_ivy_3.htm

2 fix link
source | link

It certainly looks like the vine form of Poison Ivy. The following information, taken from the About.com site, should help you confirm its identity and deal with it:

BlockquoteThese two plants always appears nondescript, making victims wonder what exactly gave them the itchy rash a day or two later. With either species, there is one reliable truism: "Leaflets Three, Let It Be."

These two plants always appears nondescript, making victims wonder what exactly gave them the itchy rash a day or two later. With either species, there is one reliable truism: "Leaflets Three, Let It Be."

Poison Oak and Ivy ALWAYS grow their leaves in groups of three. It doesn’t matter if the leaves look like ivy leaves, oak leaves or have a simple oval shape.

Look for the pattern of three leaflets branching from a single, independent stem.

You’ll find two leaves attached directly to the stalk, opposite each other.

The third leaf will jut from between them on a short stem, forming a distinct T pattern. In dry weather the leaves may droop, making the pattern hard to identify.

 

BlockquotePoison Oak and Ivy ALWAYS grow their leaves in groups of three. It doesn’t matter if the leaves look like ivy leaves, oak leaves or have a simple oval shape.

Look for the pattern of three leaflets branching from a single, independent stem.

You’ll find two leaves attached directly to the stalk, opposite each other.

The third leaf will jut from between them on a short stem, forming a distinct T pattern. In dry weather the leaves may droop, making the pattern hard to identify.

Here is a link to a leaf diagram that will help you identify it:

http://0.tqn.com/d/walking/1/0/x/g/T_Leaf_Diagram.gifhttp://0.tqn.com/d/walking/1/0/x/g/T_Leaf_Diagram.gif

And another on how to remove it:

http://landscaping.about.com/od/weedsdiseases/a/poison_oak.htm

It certainly looks like the vine form of Poison Ivy. The following information, taken from the About.com site, should help you confirm its identity and deal with it:

Blockquote

These two plants always appears nondescript, making victims wonder what exactly gave them the itchy rash a day or two later. With either species, there is one reliable truism: "Leaflets Three, Let It Be."

Poison Oak and Ivy ALWAYS grow their leaves in groups of three. It doesn’t matter if the leaves look like ivy leaves, oak leaves or have a simple oval shape.

Look for the pattern of three leaflets branching from a single, independent stem.

You’ll find two leaves attached directly to the stalk, opposite each other.

The third leaf will jut from between them on a short stem, forming a distinct T pattern. In dry weather the leaves may droop, making the pattern hard to identify.

Blockquote

Here is a link to a leaf diagram that will help you identify it:

http://0.tqn.com/d/walking/1/0/x/g/T_Leaf_Diagram.gif

And another on how to remove it:

http://landscaping.about.com/od/weedsdiseases/a/poison_oak.htm

It certainly looks like the vine form of Poison Ivy. The following information, taken from the About.com site, should help you confirm its identity and deal with it:

These two plants always appears nondescript, making victims wonder what exactly gave them the itchy rash a day or two later. With either species, there is one reliable truism: "Leaflets Three, Let It Be."

 

Poison Oak and Ivy ALWAYS grow their leaves in groups of three. It doesn’t matter if the leaves look like ivy leaves, oak leaves or have a simple oval shape.

Look for the pattern of three leaflets branching from a single, independent stem.

You’ll find two leaves attached directly to the stalk, opposite each other.

The third leaf will jut from between them on a short stem, forming a distinct T pattern. In dry weather the leaves may droop, making the pattern hard to identify.

Here is a link to a leaf diagram that will help you identify it:

http://0.tqn.com/d/walking/1/0/x/g/T_Leaf_Diagram.gif

And another on how to remove it:

http://landscaping.about.com/od/weedsdiseases/a/poison_oak.htm

1
source | link