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If its flowering now, it isn't Calluna vulgaris, that flowers mid summer through to autumn, so it's much more likely to be Erica darleyensis. The latter is in bloom now, and in many areas blooms December through to May. Image here, but note it's to a particular variety of Erica darleyensis called 'Furzey' so the colour might be slightly different https://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/erica--darleyensis-furzey/classid.565/

There is another important difference between Erica darleyensis and Calluna - the latter must have acid soil, whereas Erica will tolerate neutral to acid. All these plants are commonly known as heathers or heaths.

UPDATE:

Heathers/heaths can be difficult to tell apart just by eye, especially if they're overlapping in bloom time, so if you buy plants, it's very important to buy labelled ones, particularly if you want Erica varieties because your soil is neutral. Further complicating the Calluna/Erica confusion is Daboecia, common name Irish Heath - this link here might be useful for information about the various heathers http://northcoastgardening.com/2010/04/heather-and-heath/. These plants all belong to the Ericaceae, but there are botanical differences, usually on examining closely the sepals and corolla closely, more information on that here http://www.plantadvice.co.uk/garden-advice/articles/general/heather-or-heath/50

If its flowering now, it isn't Calluna vulgaris, that flowers mid summer through to autumn, so it's much more likely to be Erica darleyensis. The latter is in bloom now, and in many areas blooms December through to May. Image here, but note it's to a particular variety of Erica darleyensis called 'Furzey' so the colour might be slightly different https://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/erica--darleyensis-furzey/classid.565/

There is another important difference between Erica darleyensis and Calluna - the latter must have acid soil, whereas Erica will tolerate neutral to acid. All these plants are commonly known as heathers or heaths.

UPDATE:

Heathers/heaths can be difficult to tell apart just by eye, especially if they're overlapping in bloom time, so if you buy plants, it's very important to buy labelled ones, particularly if you want Erica varieties because your soil is neutral. Further complicating the Calluna/Erica confusion is Daboecia, common name Irish Heath - this link here might be useful for information about the various heathers http://northcoastgardening.com/2010/04/heather-and-heath/. These plants all belong to the Ericaceae, but there are botanical differences, usually on examining closely the sepals and corolla, more information on that here http://www.plantadvice.co.uk/garden-advice/articles/general/heather-or-heath/50

If its flowering now, it isn't Calluna vulgaris, that flowers mid summer through to autumn, so it's much more likely to be Erica darleyensis. The latter is in bloom now, and in many areas blooms December through to May. Image here, but note it's to a particular variety of Erica darleyensis called 'Furzey' so the colour might be slightly different https://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/erica--darleyensis-furzey/classid.565/

There is another important difference between Erica darleyensis and Calluna - the latter must have acid soil, whereas Erica will tolerate neutral to acid. All these plants are commonly known as heathers or heaths.

UPDATE:

Heathers/heaths can be difficult to tell apart just by eye, especially if they're overlapping in bloom time, so if you buy plants, it's very important to buy labelled ones, particularly if you want Erica varieties because your soil is neutral. Further complicating the Calluna/Erica confusion is Daboecia, common name Irish Heath - this link here might be useful for information about the various heathers http://northcoastgardening.com/2010/04/heather-and-heath/. These plants all belong to the Ericaceae, but there are botanical differences, usually on examining the sepals and corolla closely, more information on that here http://www.plantadvice.co.uk/garden-advice/articles/general/heather-or-heath/50

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If its flowering now, it isn't Calluna vulgaris, that flowers mid summer through to autumn, so it's much more likely to be Erica darleyensis. The latter is in bloom now, and in many areas blooms December through to May. Image here, but note it's to a particular variety of Erica darleyensis called 'Furzey' so the colour might be slightly different https://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/erica--darleyensis-furzey/classid.565/

There is another important difference between Erica darleyensis and Calluna - the latter must have acid soil, whereas Erica will tolerate neutral to acid. All these plants are commonly known as heathers or heaths.

UPDATE:

Heathers/heaths can be difficult to tell apart just by eye, especially if they're overlapping in bloom time, so if you buy plants, it's very important to buy labelled ones, particularly if you want Erica varieties because your soil is neutral. Further complicating the Calluna/Erica confusion is Daboecia, common name Irish Heath - this link here might be useful for information about the various heathers http://northcoastgardening.com/2010/04/heather-and-heath/

Essentially, these. These plants all belong to the Ericaceae - another link here that advises, but there are botanical differences, usually on how to tellexamining closely the differencesepals and corolla, more information on that here http://www.plantadvice.co.uk/garden-advice/articles/general/heather-or-heath/50

If its flowering now, it isn't Calluna vulgaris, that flowers mid summer through to autumn, so it's much more likely to be Erica darleyensis. The latter is in bloom now, and in many areas blooms December through to May. Image here, but note it's to a particular variety of Erica darleyensis called 'Furzey' so the colour might be slightly different https://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/erica--darleyensis-furzey/classid.565/

There is another important difference between Erica darleyensis and Calluna - the latter must have acid soil, whereas Erica will tolerate neutral to acid. All these plants are commonly known as heathers or heaths.

UPDATE:

Heathers/heaths can be difficult to tell apart just by eye, especially if they're overlapping in bloom time, so if you buy plants, it's very important to buy labelled ones, particularly if you want Erica varieties because your soil is neutral. Further complicating the Calluna/Erica confusion is Daboecia, common name Irish Heath - this link here might be useful for information about the various heathers http://northcoastgardening.com/2010/04/heather-and-heath/

Essentially, these all belong to the Ericaceae - another link here that advises on how to tell the difference http://www.plantadvice.co.uk/garden-advice/articles/general/heather-or-heath/50

If its flowering now, it isn't Calluna vulgaris, that flowers mid summer through to autumn, so it's much more likely to be Erica darleyensis. The latter is in bloom now, and in many areas blooms December through to May. Image here, but note it's to a particular variety of Erica darleyensis called 'Furzey' so the colour might be slightly different https://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/erica--darleyensis-furzey/classid.565/

There is another important difference between Erica darleyensis and Calluna - the latter must have acid soil, whereas Erica will tolerate neutral to acid. All these plants are commonly known as heathers or heaths.

UPDATE:

Heathers/heaths can be difficult to tell apart just by eye, especially if they're overlapping in bloom time, so if you buy plants, it's very important to buy labelled ones, particularly if you want Erica varieties because your soil is neutral. Further complicating the Calluna/Erica confusion is Daboecia, common name Irish Heath - this link here might be useful for information about the various heathers http://northcoastgardening.com/2010/04/heather-and-heath/. These plants all belong to the Ericaceae, but there are botanical differences, usually on examining closely the sepals and corolla, more information on that here http://www.plantadvice.co.uk/garden-advice/articles/general/heather-or-heath/50

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If its flowering now, it isn't Calluna vulgaris, that flowers mid summer through to autumn, so it's much more likely to be Erica darleyensis. The latter is in bloom now, and in many areas blooms December through to May. Image here, but note it's to a particular variety of Erica darleyensis called 'Furzey' so the colour might be slightly different https://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/erica--darleyensis-furzey/classid.565/

There is another important difference between Erica darleyensis and Calluna - the latter must have acid soil, whereas Erica will tolerate neutral to acid. All these plants are commonly known as heathers or heaths.

UPDATE:

Heathers/heaths can be difficult to tell apart just by eye, especially if they're overlapping in bloom time, so if you buy plants, it's very important to buy labelled ones, particularly if you want Erica varieties because your soil is neutral. Further complicating the Calluna/Erica confusion is Daboecia, common name Irish Heath - this link here might be useful for information about the various heathers http://northcoastgardening.com/2010/04/heather-and-heath/

Essentially, these all belong to the Ericaceae - another link here that advises on how to tell the difference http://www.plantadvice.co.uk/garden-advice/articles/general/heather-or-heath/50

If its flowering now, it isn't Calluna vulgaris, that flowers mid summer through to autumn, so it's much more likely to be Erica darleyensis. The latter is in bloom now, and in many areas blooms December through to May. Image here, but note it's to a particular variety of Erica darleyensis called 'Furzey' so the colour might be slightly different https://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/erica--darleyensis-furzey/classid.565/

There is another important difference between Erica darleyensis and Calluna - the latter must have acid soil, whereas Erica will tolerate neutral to acid. All these plants are commonly known as heathers or heaths.

If its flowering now, it isn't Calluna vulgaris, that flowers mid summer through to autumn, so it's much more likely to be Erica darleyensis. The latter is in bloom now, and in many areas blooms December through to May. Image here, but note it's to a particular variety of Erica darleyensis called 'Furzey' so the colour might be slightly different https://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/erica--darleyensis-furzey/classid.565/

There is another important difference between Erica darleyensis and Calluna - the latter must have acid soil, whereas Erica will tolerate neutral to acid. All these plants are commonly known as heathers or heaths.

UPDATE:

Heathers/heaths can be difficult to tell apart just by eye, especially if they're overlapping in bloom time, so if you buy plants, it's very important to buy labelled ones, particularly if you want Erica varieties because your soil is neutral. Further complicating the Calluna/Erica confusion is Daboecia, common name Irish Heath - this link here might be useful for information about the various heathers http://northcoastgardening.com/2010/04/heather-and-heath/

Essentially, these all belong to the Ericaceae - another link here that advises on how to tell the difference http://www.plantadvice.co.uk/garden-advice/articles/general/heather-or-heath/50

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