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13

Those are male flowers, so what you're experiencing (no fruit) is absolutely normal. Female flowers have a mini fruit underneath, and usually appear when the plant is a little older. Look for a miniature fruit under the flower. The shape will depend on your variety. It looks like you may already have 1 or 2. It is normal for a young squash plant of any kind ...


10

This could be Blossom End Rot (BER) to which most of the cucurbit family are susceptible. It is caused by a calcium deficiency - see my answer here. However, given that some of your courgettes are growing normally, and those that are rotting are very small, I think the problem is almost certainly caused by inadequate pollination: No fruit, or fruit ...


7

Edited to add: Ahhh! The pictures you added tell a lot. Your plants are further along than I assumed based on your original post. When the plants are as far along as yours are, flowers not opening can be a sign of stress. Sometimes it happens when you have a squash vine borer, but in your case, I think it is because the plants are much too close together. I ...


7

This does sound like a pollination problem. There is a detailed article explaining how to hand-pollinate zucchini and cucumber plants here. Briefly, to hand-pollinate your flowers: Identify the female flowers (unlike the male ones, they have a small fruit behind them); Gently remove a male flower from the vine, without touching the anthers (see diagram), ...


6

Well, you can't stop zucchini(courgettes) from growing and they're prolific growers. But they keep pretty well, just pick them small which will encourage them to grow more, so maybe you can afford to give a few away (not just the huge ones). You could always plant fewer and space them out more so you can spot 'em easier before they get humungous. As for ...


5

It seems to be called zucchini tromboncino. Here are some pictures that all look like yours. North American zucchini = European courgette. (BTW some of the pictures fall somewhere between funny and not quite NSFW.)


5

Look at the stem, down near the base. Do you see some distinctive brown-orange sawdust-like material? If so, that's called frass, and your plant is being destroyed by one or more squash vine borers. The wikipedia article is really good, and shows pictures (at the bottom) of what to look for. We've tried killing the grubs in the stem, with a hatpin and ...


3

Did you "harden off" your transplants first? I'm asking because this all looks like minor damage from not allowing your plants to gradually acclimate themselves to the outdoors, where the sun is stronger and the temperatures fluctuate and the wind blows, before being put outside all the time. The beige-brown patches on the Zucchini looks like sunburn. The ...


3

I've never had a problem with cucumber beetles nor do I have any experience using the following products but this is what's listed in my current Johnny's Selected Seeds catalog as their recommendations for cucumber beetles. They are all marked as organic. Azaguard - $134 Qt. Mycotrol O - $109 Qt. Pyganic* - 1.4% concentration for $69.95 Qt. or 5% ...


2

If mange tout1 is the same as what we call a "snap pea" or a "snow pea", it's not that it's immature, it's a different variety. (Well, I generally eat them before the peas fatten up, so they are immature, but I don't do this with "garden peas" (aka "English peas") because the pods aren't very tasty.) Hmm... what's a marrow? It looks like a member of C. ...


2

Looks like some variety of Cucuzza


2

Without the benefit of a picture, I can suggest (quoting from "The Organic Gardener's Handbook of Natural Pest and Disease Control") the following, with my most likely guesses first: Downy mildew: Leaves mottled yellow between veins; purple spots on leaf undersides. ... thrives during cool, wet weather. Avoid wetting foliage. Maybe spray with potassium ...


2

If the blossom end turns black, that's blossom end rot, due to irregular water supply disabling calcium uptake, but the other cause of this problem is the female flower, particularly when the weather is wet. The flower traps water and causes the end of the burgeoning zucchini to start rotting. It usually only affects some of the fruits, and a way round it is ...


2

If the stem has softened, and there is a small amount of sawdust-like frass by the split, you have squash vine borer. These pests are the larvae of a moth, and feed on the inside of the zucchini stem by the base of the plant. To control, slit the stem open carefully along the main stem until you locate the worm (it is usually not far from the slit it made). ...


1

This can happen if the plant experiences more extreme conditions like if it suddenly takes in a lot of water. If the plant seems otherwise unaffected then you probably don't need to worry. Some people will pile soil around the split area or provide extra support for the plant if you think it's been weakened by the split.


1

From "The Organic Gardener's Handbook of Natural Pest and Disease Control", p262-263: Prevention: Remove and destroy crop residues Cover with floating row cover (and pollinate by hand) Cure: Apply kaolin clay, especially to leaf undersides; reapply after rain Handpick or vacuum beetles Apply parasitic nematodes to soil weekly to control larvae Spray ...


1

If it happens when they are very small then it is just an abort. It happens to some varieties more than others. A little bit bigger (flower opened and closed), they could have pollination problems or a problem with inconsistent watering. I haven't noticed a problem with BER with zucchini.



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