New answers tagged

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You will likely need to cut out those severely browned areas and fit new sod in. Try to get the sod from the same grower, if possible, to match. Make sure the soil in the problem areas is highly amended with rich humous and peat prior to resoding. Those red bricks sure can heat up and I believe that's a lot of the problem in those areas. Water, water, water. ...


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The best thing you could do is simply get a little longer hose or invest in a sprinkler that has a higher pressure to water bigger areas at a time. You could also go and water the little bit manually, if that is not a problem.


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It's not the rain as such, it's the high humidity when it rains that triggers flowering. As said previously, they need periods of drought and they are bulbs, which means they may repeat flower, but can't be in flower all the time, or whenever you wish them to be, if that is frequently. If you could find a way of raising the humidity of the air around them, ...


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This plant is Zephyranthes carinata, a bulb with the common name Rain Lily. There are lots of hybrids these days, but the reason they're called rain lilies is because they flower after rain. Some only flower once a year, and that is later in the summer/autumn, when the autumn or summer rains arrive, but some of the newer hybrids flower more often and do ...


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Blueberry bushes need consistently moist soil. To avoid breaking the flowers, and to keep them healthy, they should be watered at the root level. According to this site about growing blueberries, the best choice is a soaker hose. Although I don't grow blueberries, I use soakers on various annuals, perennials and bushes, and absolutely love them! They're easy ...


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Yes, there are so many great products out there. Your hardware/garden store will have all sorts of sprinklers, hoses and timers to match your needs. There are other methods to automatically water a garden too. One DIY method I've used is to buy a cheap hose and poke holes in it before I bury it under a thin layer of soil. The tap is then timer-controlled. ...


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As far as I know, Brown tips like that are caused by the oils from people or animals touching them. If you have animals, move them out of reach, and if you handle the leaves a lot, stop.


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There really are not many fruit trees that will tolerate wet feet. They may grow OK for awhile, but their lives are likely to be shortened by root rot. You might be able to grow Juneberries there. They're a small native tree with blueberry-like berries. They tolerate wet soil better than cultivated fruits. I'd plant the fig tree elsewhere if you want to grow ...


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I would like to point out that the water produced by your dehumidifier is not "distilled" but "condensed". Distilled water has been raised to a boil, converted to STEAM and then the steam is captured and allowed to cool, this water should be exceptionally clean, because impurities have been removed by this process. The water produced by your dehumidifier ...


4

It's a miracle so many of us survived childhood. I drank from hoses all the time, and I've lived to tell the story. Even so, it's not a safe practice. As you know, there are several "drinking water safe" hoses out there. Using a reel, as I also do, is efficient, but does little to prevent the growth of bacteria in the residual water left in the hose. ...


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Disclaimer: I've done all of this in my own apartment too, and is based on my personal experimentation/research. I recently grew plants hydroponically in distilled water. It worked fine, but I had to manually measure and re-add the required minerals for the plants to be healthy. If you can't or don't want to carefully re-add minerals I recommend you avoid ...


6

Just over a hundred years ago, in 1915, a chap called M.C. Merrill did some experiments on this (that link may be paywalled, sorry) and found that, while plants would grow with distilled water, it was not a great choice. (If you prefer to read the very lengthy report of that study in its entirety, it's available for free in the Annals of the Missouri ...


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Provided that you are feeding the soil/plants the macro and micro nutrients they need there shouldn't be an issue. Epsom salt (1tbsp/gallon) every now and then helps with some of the micro nutrients. Minerals for your plants can be supplemented via plant food, rock dust, azomite or greensand if needed or through the soil/potting mix of the plants unless ...


2

The theory behind not watering immediately after repotting is that you are inducing the roots to grow a little more vigorously to search for water and therefore 'rooting the plant in'. I personally find the with enough care whilst transplanting, I.e. Spreading the roots, making sure there are no air pockets in the substrate, etc. You will have a decent ...


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The trouble with gardening is, ask a panel of experts a question and you'll get 3 different answers. I remember your original question on this plant and then, you believed you should wait for the peat soil it was in to dry out before attempting to repot in different soil. That wasn't true, and I don't think this latest thing is any more true either - when I ...


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Spray some WD-40 and then try to move the balls with a piece of rubber, or with your finger wearing rubber gloves. I've used this technique to free a sensor wheel from a thermal heater clogged with mud and debris.



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