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2

Spray some WD-40 and then try to move the balls with a piece of rubber, or with your finger wearing rubber gloves. I've used this technique to free a sensor wheel from a thermal heater clogged with mud and debris.


4

Would not water every day, you can create problems. You can for one: kill the plant, there would not be any air going to the plants root and would kill of the roots. two: You could grow mold around the plant and on the plant. In the end killing it as well, plus then you would have to toss out the dirt to stop it from spreading.


5

Let the soil dry out a bit before watering. Dig down 1 inch into the soil. If the 1 inch of soil is dry, water it. If the leaves are wilting, or "deflated", it needs water. I mention deflated leaves for onions and garlics because they are round, hollow, and structurally strong, so they may not literally fall over until they are near death from lack of ...


3

I think your tree's roots are damaged. It is important to keep the tree from desiccating before the roots can recover. You need to make a little terrarium for it. This will reduce the rate moisture is lost to the air. Put a clear and/or translucent plastic bag over it or cut the bottom off a clear and/or translucent plastic container (e.g.,milk container, ...


1

I think the comments that suggest you'd have more success if you started your seeds in smaller containers and then moved them into the barrels are spot-on. Using a seed tray or small starter pots makes it easier to ensure that you're providing the optimal conditions for the seeds to grow. It may also mean you can find a place for them that you'll keep an eye ...


11

Judging by the new growth being red, I'd say these were Photinia fraserii 'Red Robin'. I can't tell if they're pleached or not, can't see any framework within the foliage, so its possible they're just trained by pruning to this shape. Unless you live somewhere that gets very hot and very dry in summer, they shouldn't need much watering because they have ...


0

I would use bark and not peat; in fact I do. Once peat become dry it is seems impossible to wet again and when it is dry it easily blows away. It may be that peat and sand will do the job but I've acquired a strong prejudice against the stuff. Fir bark is inexpensive and easily available here in western Washington, so I have no cost incentive to even think ...



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