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9

If the greywater is from food preparation, it's fine to use if it doesn't contain salt, oil, or big pieces of food. I'd use a strainer, to get all the pieces. I think the water from the food dehydrator is fine, if it was used only for plant matter, not animal. So no animal, no salt, no oil, and I'd say if you were baking in the kitchen, don't use rinse ...


4

Soil humidity is not the term to use. Humidity is the amount of water vapour in the air. Moisture level is what you are measuring. The tool you are using likely measures conductivity which increases when more water ions are present. A self watering container uses capillary action to maintain a steady amount of water in the soil. Depending on the amount ...


4

My desert tortoise loves bean leaves, and will eat kale if he's hungry enough. But I prefer to feed him native plants. I let him go for walks in the yard and observe what he eats, then tend those plants and try to propagate them. I don't actually know the names of all the plants he likes, but one of his favorites is globe mallow. I let one globe mallow ...


5

I wonder whether turtles mind bitter greens? What we find unpalatable might be just fine with them. And some of the most nutritious greens out there aren't the ones we tend to prefer the taste of. Also, from what little I understand of tortoise diets, getting the proper balance of nutrients through appropriate foods for your particular type of tortoise is ...


2

All of them you listed, except bok choi, are going to be fairly basic. First of all, you will need to know that they have to grow to maturity outside the tortoise's enclosure. If you leave the plant in the enclosure, it will likely not get enough light, but more importantly, the tortoise won't graze nicely, but keep eating the plant off at the ground level. ...


1

Following comments above - I'd use proper leaky pipe, not a soaker hose, that is, the greyish fibrous looking pipe that's meant to be buried 3 inches below the soil level. These don't get clogged because they don't have holes which drip as such, they seep into the soil along the entire length. The drawback is if you frequently want to dig the area or plant ...


1

If your soil stays wet for too long, it can lead to root decay and even some fungus problems on the surface of the dirt, moving up to your leaves on your plants. I have a similar problem as my garden is on a slight slope, and it all collects in a bottom corner. What I did was plant very thirsty plants in the collection areas, such as watermelon to drink ...


1

Get a cactus :) I water mine about once a month. there are some varieties that aren't too prickly. With literal rocks in the soil, there's virtually no over-flow.


5

I wouldn't recommend it long term but in the short term, it should be fine EXCEPT it's salted. Cook your pasta without salt while there's a drought and then use the water. It doesn't really need salt to cook anyway, usually any kind of sauce you're using on the pasta is salted, so its not essential. If you notice a difference in the pasta, return to using ...


2

oil and salt in it might indeed be an issue if you are using just this water and in a container or a place where the drainage is poor. I would not do it personally. Also, the gain is low considering that you will need to make a pot dirty to gather the water and let it cool down, the water you saved is lost when washing that pot...


5

If you're having a drought, I'd say you'll be fine using it for a short period of time. You mentioned adding salt; this will build up in containers every day you use it, and eventually will harm the plant. Don't use for prolonged periods, and dilute it if possible, as far as possible. Pasta water contains residue full of carbohydrates, so the bacterial ...


3

If you're like me, and use some vegetable oil in the water to keep the noodles from sticking together, you'll want to be careful not to get it on the plant itself. The oil will heat up in the sun and burn the plant. As for the soil, as long as there is good drainage, I think you should be fine. I might consider not doing so if it's in a container. I'm not ...


-1

There are pots for indoor plants, they don't have a hole at the bottom and can be put on a desk. When planting in such a pot you have to put something on the bottom to provide a space for any exess water - I use pieces of broken ceramic pots (many garden centres give them for free) and/or pebbles.



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