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yo... do it all at once.... Yeah.... nuf said.


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This is difficult to say as some of the more obvious problems are not apparent: I don't see any sign of scale or thrip the portions of the leave that are browning do not look like they have a fungus or virus no signs of nutritional deficiency I suggest that over watering might be the cause. provide more light ensure good drainage water thoroughly and ...


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The other answers give good advice, but nobody is mentioning the one fatal error that could be lurking unnoticed: make sure the water has had time to cool before pouring it on. While you might have thought of this, new gardeners might not.


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The water is not lost when washing pot because if it's not salted and no oil is used, its fine to water non-potted plants with it, and therefore the water from the pot is re-used and the pot is just washed, versus if water was not re-used it would be wasted along with water to wash pot.


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If it smells "off" I'd discard the whole plant and start a new plant from seed (and not from its seed.) I have stressed basil in many ways and it has continued to taste good, so I think it's unlikely that it's a stress reaction or reversible. I'd go with "a bad plant" or "a plant that's bad when mature, even if it was OK before maturity" and change plants.


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I'm been messing with small versions of these, making 2 liter soda bottles of them to start seeds and propagate cuttings. I've had really good success with lemon seeds, but I've been a little disappointed with the other plants. I don't know if it's the temperature and humidity difference in the house in winter as opposed to in the sun in summer, but my other ...


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I'm not sure about hyacinths specifically, but I found some good sources indicating that rice water is actually beneficial for plants; as the starch in the water encourages healthy bacteria, and the enzymes found naturally in the water act like fertilizer. From Thrifty Fun: Just like potato water, rice water also contains valuable nutrients for ...


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This is on loam, may not work well on sandy, well drained soil. The way I did it was to have shallow trenches on either side of the raised bed (4-6in berm) my tomatoes were planted in. The berm was prepared with shallow depressions where each plant would be placed and the mulch film rolled out over the top of the berm with enough slack to let it sag into ...


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Yes. I've never had drip irrigation, but I have used plastic much some years. If watering is needed, pour it in the holes where the plants are (or I suppose you could make other holes for it, but I never have). Or you could park a soaker hose under the plastic and connect it when needed. You can shape the ground such that most water landing on the plastic ...


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Tulips are ideally transplanted during their dormant period (before they flower), which is in the autumn if you live in the northern hemisphere, or during the spring if you live in the southern hemisphere. Planting bulbs in the autumn enables a strong root system to form, which supports the plant during its flowering stage. Transplanting plants while its ...


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I'd say it's probably a combination of being transplanted and then being subjected to sun and heat. When transplanting in the spring and summer while the plants need to hold on to as much water as they can (I don't mean watering a lot, I mean holding on to what they already have), you want to keep them cool and shaded so they aren't respiring so much.


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The reason for the cautious watering recommendations is that these are extremely susceptible to root rot, and even what would be a light schedule for another plant will kill these. Watering when shriveling is a good system. I usually go by soil rather than the plant, and water when the top 2/3's of the mix are bone dry, barely moistening the soil. In a small ...



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