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This may turn out to be an unpopular answer, but your best bet is to replace that grass with some dry climate shrubs. Adding some dry climate shrubs but not removing all the grass is another option. The shrubs should actually help contain moisture near to their bases. Watering lawns is going the way of the dinosaurs, and if you are uncomfortable with it ...


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I'm not sure what type of plant that is, but from the look of it, you need to check a couple of things out. One is to check and see if those rocks are glued on. Home Depot and other similar stores take a random plant, strip a few leaves off and call it a bonsai. A bonsai is supposed to represent and old, old version of the tree you are growing. This includes ...


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I was going to drill 8" holes, but it looked like it was just too far apart. I went with 4" spacing and assembled it. I tried the two piece of just one row before drilling the rest and the water was shooting out almost 6'. Once it was together I turned it on and it worked fine. The only problem I had is that my garden sits on a slight hill, so I'm getting ...


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Worst case scenario, they lost more root-volume than they can recover from, in which case they'll die in short order. More likely, given proper watering from here on, they'll rebuild the lost roots and grow strong again. Aside from the watering error it sounds like you've got them well situated, I'd say they most likely will bounce back in a few days with ...


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Adding pebbles to the top of the pot would likely somewhat reduce the rate that water evaporates from the pot simply by reducing the amount of moist soil that is directly exposed to drier air. Of course, this can be accounted for very easily just by reducing the frequency of waterings to allow the soil a little more time to dry. The pebbles themselves ...


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I can't decide whether its just salt deposits or fungal in origin. Either way, it appears to be time to remove any loose soil from the top of the pot, without damaging the roots, and replace with fresh potting compost or whatever it is you use. If you live in a hardwater area, its more likely to be deposits. You'd be better off not using tapwater, well, at ...


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Yellowing of the lower leaves can be caused by a few different things (and these are different things than if it starts with the upper leaves). How the leaves are yellowing can give you clues as to what is wrong. If the whole leaf is yellowing, nitrogen deficiency is often the cause. If just the edges of the lower leaves are yellowing, potassium deficiency ...


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Absolutely. I would go with the wetland grasses route, these plants are hearty and can handle standing water. Your biggest problem is going to be sun, so you will want the tallest grasses possible, to take most advantage of that indirect light bounced off the neighboring building. Plants use water mostly for photosynthesis, the more photosynthesis they ...


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Rainwater is generally better. Chlorine, fluoride, bleach and such, which are in a lot of city water, may not harm your plants in the drinkable amounts, per se, but they certainly may harm the beneficial microbes in your soil, which will reduce the benefit you would gain from those microbes (which may be considerable). I find that my tomato plants last year ...


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I think your best bet is to look into plants that are used in graywater garden design. Cattails are one very common one, as they don't mind standing in water, as are bulrush, canna lily and reed canary grass. They are all tough, and seem to grow well on graywater. ETA: I looked up the calculation - you'll need about 1.25 square feet of wetland plants per ...


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I would say it isn't really workable, even ignoring the possibility of contamination from the water killing plants quite quickly. I have a balcony in London UK which is 5.5 feet wide by 12 feet long - it has large and medium pots and containers all round the outside edge. Its south facing, so in full sun all day, and summer temperatures here can be anything ...


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Provided the plants are not in pots, and provided you spread it around, not concentrating it in one area every time, it should be okay - but I wouldn't recommend it long term, nor more frequently than once a week on each area of soil. If there's rain in between, all the better, it'll help dilute things a bit. If you notice ill effects on the plants, stop ...


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This is difficult to say as some of the more obvious problems are not apparent: I don't see any sign of scale or thrip the portions of the leave that are browning do not look like they have a fungus or virus no signs of nutritional deficiency I suggest that over watering might be the cause. provide more light ensure good drainage water thoroughly and ...


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The other answers give good advice, but nobody is mentioning the one fatal error that could be lurking unnoticed: make sure the water has had time to cool before pouring it on. While you might have thought of this, new gardeners might not.


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The water is not lost when washing pot because if it's not salted and no oil is used, its fine to water non-potted plants with it, and therefore the water from the pot is re-used and the pot is just washed, versus if water was not re-used it would be wasted along with water to wash pot.


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If it smells "off" I'd discard the whole plant and start a new plant from seed (and not from its seed.) I have stressed basil in many ways and it has continued to taste good, so I think it's unlikely that it's a stress reaction or reversible. I'd go with "a bad plant" or "a plant that's bad when mature, even if it was OK before maturity" and change plants.



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