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Always drainage. Even semi-aquatic plants - in nature there is water movement through the root systems which introduces oxygen. There's no such thing as too much drainage, just too much drainage for a reasonable watering schedule. Container material isn't too big of a deal. Clay's advantages are weight (no toppling over in wind), porosity, and sturdiness (...


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This the first time I used greywater to water my plants. I have a vegetable garden. My father used greywater in the past for his garden and we ate the vegetables from it all summer and we did not get sick. As for the greywater harming the plants, I've never seen plants that look so healthy. Our garden is thriving. The water includes shower, laundry and ...


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Personally I would water them first since water can wash away the hill. You see, the plant doesn't need any water in the hill. The hill is strictly for preventing sunlight from getting to the young potatoes while they are growing. An alternative to hilling is to stack boxes or tires around the plant and filling the stack with straw to stop light from ...


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Water from a hose is usually delivered at a faster rate than rain falling on say pottered plants. Usually all the rain falling on a potted plant remains in the pot but the outflow at the bottom of the pots with hose water will take many leached nutrients with it. Another factor is the build up of hard deposits on the parts of the plant which take in the ...


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The "don't water midday" rule comes from folks saying that water droplets focus the sun's rays and burn the foliage. My counter to this is purely anecdotal, but I've never seen leaf burn on anything and I have seen the positive effects of cooling off plants just after the midday sun bake is over. Watering in the morning will allow a lot more water to get to ...


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I see this is a rather old question, but the answers don't address the over watering of houseplants problem. My wife has murdered MANY indoor plants, and the reason is very simple, she thinks they are thirsty ALL THE TIME. She believes that they are always thirsty. NOT TRUE!! Always make sure you water the plant when the soil is DRY to the touch. Also: ...


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In my experience, watering at night allows the water to penetrate deeper, but it does promote slugs,snails, mildew and mold etc. During winter the water can also freeze on the plants and damage them. (much more than frost would). I think that watering early in the morning is the best (like 4am) - avoids the freezing problem, and in my experience can ...


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If you water at night, the water has a greater chance of penetrating more deeply into the soil without being lost due to evaporation and transpiration from plant leaves. The downside is that you are more likely to have water sitting on leaves, and other plant structures that might promote fungal growth. So be sure to water the ground and not the plant. If ...


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Watering in the morning gives your plants more free water to use during the day, watering at night can promote fungus growth due to excessive sitting moisture. Think like towels and mildew. Drop and wet heap of towels on the ground at night and by the morning they'll start to stink, but hang them to dry in the sun and they'll smell like the countryside. As ...


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Since you're starting with soiless systems, the time for severe fungal infections takes longer to develop. But they do. And it may be that the seedlings get infected before transplantation into the hydroponic systems as they may not be grown in sterile media. Run to waste systems seem more prone to symptomatic infection then recirculating systems ...


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This the first time I used greywater to water my plants. I have a vegetable garden. My father used greywater in the past for his garden and we ate the vegetables from it all summer and we did not get sick. As for the greywater harming the plants, I've never seen plants that look so healthy. Our garden is thriving. The water includes shower, laundry and ...


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If you can control the time when water comes, only water during the night. Then if you have an input from temperature, only water when its above 80°F. From experience, I know that watering too much can be armfull. It really depends what you intend to do. if you want to grow vegetables in the intensive way, then you might want to water all the time and ...


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There are many web sites that make wide ranging statements about plants that repeal mosquitoes. I cannot find any academic research that supports this. I can find university sites that say that there is no plant that acts as a mosquito repellant by just being there. Any essential oils in the plant leaves must distributed in the air or applied to skin ...


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If you can manage to get a few marigolds, plant those. They thrive on a lot of sunshine, can be grown in pots, and are good at repelling mosquitoes and most other insect pests. The beautiful flowers are a bonus.


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I'm assuming by terrace you mean outdoors and not in - the tag of houseplant makes me ask. On the assumption you mean plants suitable for pots outdoors, lemon scented plants such as Citronella and Lemon Balm are good. Plants offered for sale under the name citronella vary - the one to look for is Cymbopogon nardus, or Citronella winterianus. Cymbopogon does ...


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I read that in Malta it is frequent to use basil to repel mosquitos. It likes sun, but it should to be watered often to maintain the green leaves and smell. (Note: it is resilient also to dry periods).


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I wouldn't recommend the habit of giving any plant "just a bit of water" if that means "less than it really needs". Over time it can lead to poor development of the plant, like a shallow root system to catch most of the "bits of water" in the short term at the expense of getting a proper supply of water and nutrients from deeper in the soil in the long term. ...


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If the plants are in containers, you water as normal - unless rain is torrential and persistent, it doesn't make much impact on potted plants, especially as the season progresses and topgrowth/foliage increases in size, helping to keep even more rain off the soil in the pots. I'm assuming the containers have drainage holes...


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It depends on what the aim is. If you want healthy looking plants, then sure, make sure that they have a regular supply of water. But over watering also results in (micro)nutrient loss from the soil as it gets washed into the lower layers beyond the reach of the roots. So, in this respect it might be better to retain the water in the soil (with mulching) ...


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Transplanting is something best done if/when a plant is dormant; if that can't be achieved then done using a maximal amount of surrounding soil, so the roots (even the fine ones) are not cut. In this case I would agree entirely with kevinsky - don't transplant, do water enough to keep the soil damp but not saturated. It might be helpful (not sure) to ...



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