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12

This looks like Virgin's Bower, aka Clematis Virginiana, to me. It is commonly mistaken for poison ivy. The wikipedia article on poison ivy has a list of plants that are commonly mistaken for poison ivy.


10

How about Jasmine? Not exactly a vine, but there are many species that might be suitable for you. They bloom at night and their perfume is incredible (there are varieties that don't have any scent, though).


10

From the photos, and your description it sounds like Morning Glory. They can be cultivated as a flower, but they're most usually known as a troublesome weed that's very hard to eradicate. They will grow back from the smallest segment of root, so pulling them up means taking a lot of care not to leave little pieces behind. They can also smother other more ...


9

For killing weeds in an established lawn, a Weed Spray is usually the easiest way. A weed spray kills weeds without harming grass (provided the grass is healthy). I've had good luck with Spectracide, but the Ortho product mentioned in here works well too. The Spectracide label says it kills Ground Ivy, so it should work on your weed. Some tips: Note ...


9

These are two different plants. The one in the second (lower) photo is astilbe, a common ornamental, perennial garden plant; it is not poisonous. With a number of plants imitating poison ivy in form of leaf, it's difficult to determine what the plant is in the first photo. There is considerable variation in the leaf shape (toothed vs lobed) and surface ...


8

Mint does not care for being mowed. If you just assert your ownership of that bit of the lawn, and mow and weed whack as you prefer, eventually it will be less minty. Oregano, in contrast, seems to decide to become a creeping ground cover in the face of endless mowing, which isn't entirely a bad thing. We have fragrant walking paths. Sure, while there are ...


8

The leaves have a different texture than poison ivy. They are also more serrated than poison ivy is. I don't think it is poison ivy. I can't say what it is though.


8

I suspect most weed and feed products will be pre-emergents, meaning you need to get it in your lawn before the weed seeds have a chance to germinate, which is a limited window. Once something like this is already growing, you're usually left with the round-up type of products, which kill everything they touch, or hand pulling. After a long day in the ...


8

Based on what I've seen, and confirmed a bit by a couple of quick searches, the photos on top with the deeply indented leaves look like melon. The one on the bottom looks like a cucumber, though maybe it could be a squash. As a side note, zucchini, acorn, and spaghetti squashes are all C. pepo and could have crossed last year. If you have volunteers from ...


7

If you're willing to grow veggies, snap peas are great! They don't need much tending, they're one of the first things to pop out of the soil in the spring, long before the last frost. And they are one of the best things to snack on straight off the vine. They can be planted densely, will climb any trellis you give them without much direction. And they ...


7

This is just a suggestion - but time, I believe is of the essence. I think you may have a problem with soil compaction around the place where those vines are taking root so I'm not sure how you're going to get it out of there. What you could do is cover the vine with soil where the topsoil where it is taking root. Wait a week so while keeping the soil ...


7

It's a good idea to prune them now before the normal pruning time. They are not going to be useful for the future of the vine or fruit in the short term so they are a waste of energy that would go to other parts of the vine.


7

This is a variety of Houttuynia cordata. The most popular cultivar is "Variegata" which has multicoloured leaves of white green and red. The way to confirm the identification is to pinch off a leaf. There is a unique smell associated with this plant. I can't describe it but the Wikipedia article refers to it as "fish mint". If it has mosquito repellent ...


6

For variety, try a packet of goblins egg gourds, they're very prolific and don't require all that much soil. I'm growing a gourd within a gourd right now (sort of a recursive programmer/gardening joke)


5

Oh boy! I made the same mistake and now mine occupies about 3-4 times the area in the pic on the right here (that was taken last Oct). It's hard to tell if you're really done pulling it out, because the stolons could have propagated quite far. I don't know of an easy way (I doubt there's one...). The approach I'm taking now is to mercilessly cull most of ...


5

That is Passiflora suberosa, or corky stem passionflower. The fruits are edible when ripe. They can contain small amounts of cyanide when green. References: 1. (cabi.org) http://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/38805 2. (toptropicals.com) http://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/Passiflora_suberosa.htm 3. (weedyconnections.com) ...


5

My father-in-law (who has been growing grapes for decades) came over on the weekend and cut off all the shoots. When I asked him about it, he said that none of them would produce any grapes this year, and they'd end up getting pruned next spring, so there was no harm in pulling them off now.


5

You should wait till winter, and prune around mid to late Feb. Whatever growth you have now, you should let be. Generally, this is a good resource: http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/1000/1428.html


5

If you want a good flower show next year, I would stay away from the woody vines. Although you may get some flowering next year, it is unlikely to be very exciting. I would look at annual and herbaceous perennial vines. My favorites include: Annual Vines Firecracker Vine (Ipomoea lobata syn. Mina lobata) Hyacinth Bean (Dolichos lablab) Black-eyed Susan ...


5

This is wild grape vine! The leaves of wild grape vary quite a bit, but this is one type. Look up Vitis mustangensis, Mustang Grape.


5

It's a clematis, a climbing vine with hundreds of cultivars. I originally thought it was a Jackmannii cultivar but the colour is not quite right. To confirm the identification look for tendrils that come off the vine and help it cling and older stems that are thin but woody. Propagation of the species is easy from seed, the cultivars may not be so vigorous. ...


4

I have had some pretty good success with Ortho Weed-B-Gon Max. I have used it on crabgrass, clover, and wild onion and it does a pretty good job. Pretty much I have used it for spot treatment in small areas but you can also use it with a sprayer to spray a larger area.


4

Honeysuckle vines have very hard wood. I have snapped sequiteur blades trying to cut a branch only 3/4" diameter. If you have a lot of old vines that have not been pruned I recommend an industrial approach. rent a chainsaw and cut the vines back near the base. (Be extremely careful not to snag the chainsaw on the fence. Use hearing protectors, safety ...


4

Beware, that does not appear to be Passiflora subpeltata because the fruit are the wrong color. It is a Passiflora, though its dangerous to eat the fruit if it is an unknown variety. Those fruit are way too small to eat anyways since its the pulp inside that is eaten and those would have scant pulp.


4

I have it growing in my garden in the southern most part of Virginia. I can attest that it is extremely invasive. On the other hand, it makes a beautiful display with the white flowers in May. After that, I'm in a never ending battle of keeping it at bay. It is even growing up through the deck. It grows solid green in my garden with full morning sun (east ...


4

I agree, you certainly don't need a formal blueprint to construct a garden trellis. What I'd do on spacing is take the recommended support spacing for hardy kiwi, and use that as your standard since it is likely to be the largest, heaviest vine you will be planting. If you do this, your structure should handle any of the other vines you plan to put on it ...


3

In no particular order of preference Akebia, the Chocolate vine fragrant purplish or reddish flowers, semi evergreen, pest and disease free, flowers have an edible pulp-any type of soil, tolerates shade. Downsides: plant two for fruit production, not a native North American plant, might be too vigorous if it likes it Celastrus scandens, bittersweet, ...


3

It does not look like any poison ivy, oak, or sumac variant that I've ever seen. They usually have leaves that grow in a trio. Have you ever seen it seed/fruit? I'm placing a guess that it's a Manroot vine. I'm not a botanist so it might be worthwhile to put on some gloves, put a cutting in a plastic bag, and check with a local nursery.


3

Looks like Ampelopsis brevipedunculata 'Elegans'. http://www.yourgardenshow.com/plants/6810-Ampelopsis-brevipedunculata-Elegans-



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