Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

The proper answer is "read the manual and do what it says". There is usually a list of maintenance that should be performed once a season. Some common items: Drain the fuel, or run it until it is empty. Change oil Check/replace spark plug Replace air filter Replace fuel filter Scrape clippings from under the deck Blade sharpen/balance, replace blade if ...


11

First let me say, I'm no expert when it comes to sharpening lawnmower blades, I've done it on the odd occasion -- only on rotary mower blades, never on cylinder or reel mower blades. I do sharpen my own hand-tools, things like wood chisels, plane blades, etc and use sharpening stones to do those, but when it comes to lawnmower blades I've personally found ...


10

I use my hose all winter as part of maintaining a backyard rink. We use brass fittings and they don't leak. Now, we don't leave the hose outside with water in it, and I don't think you should either. (At the risk of being overly clear I mean the habit of turning off the hose at the nozzle (the business end), then walking back to the tap and turning off the ...


10

My guess is that painting the metal would not hold up well. Shovels and Pitchforks in use basically will run up against things which cause the paint to chip off fairly quickly. I would just try to clean the rust off. A wire brush or a wire brush wheel would probably work well to clean them up. As far as the handles, you may want to consider just replacing ...


9

For a walk behind mower: Every use: check fuel check oil, add as needed light cleaning (quick wipe down with a rag or broom) Roughly twice a season or as needed: blade sharpening detailed cleaning (get all the stuck on gunk from under the deck) First mow of the year. Do in order to save trips to parts store: inspect pull cord start sharpen blade ...


9

In the absence of a better answer, here's what I do on my walk-behind 24" "flat blade" / vertical-axis mower: Before doing anything else, remove the wire from the spark plug. You don't want it to start accidentally. Wear heavy gloves. Turn the machine on its side. Gas tank up, so it doesn't leak. (Ideally, the tank is empty when I do this.) Wedge a board ...


8

These seem trendy. They are glass bulbs that you fill with water, then stick in the soil. They'll slowly drain over a few days:


7

I don't have a lawn tractor, but presumably this is a lead acid battery? (i.e. similar to a car battery but smaller) If so, when stored for long periods of time, they should be hooked up to a slow charger. Power requirements are minimal: what you need is more of a float charger to avoid self-discharge. (i.e. any lead acid battery charger will do, but set it ...


7

I'm assuming you want to keep using these tools, and not just clean them up for display. I'd avoid painting them, at least with anything you'd pick up at the local Home Depot. There are, of course, ways of applying paint to metal that are more durable (think of they guys who are painting and repainting cars using professional spray gear), but that's ...


6

change oil, change spark plug, clean deck underneath, sharpen blades. if it came with someone to push it, tip them well.


6

I've done my fair share of woodworking and carpentry that I've used oils to both treat/finish wood and to maintain tools and am familiar with the hazards of not disposing it off properly. As for using boiled linseed oil which dries quickly (actual linseed oil can take ages) to maintain your tools, just dip a rag (cotton wool or a cloth) in them and coat a ...


6

Yes, this is a good practice. Candidates for cleaning include secateurs, hedge shears, grafting knives and anything that contacts plant tissue. A quick dip in alcohol followed by a wipe down should go a long way to remove any plant material that has pathogens in it. However, as much as it is good advice, I rarely do this. alcohol can rust steel and ...


5

You should wipe the tools with a clean cloth to remove excess oil. The excess oil will accumulate dust and other particles that you don't want to leave on your tools. When I want it to soak into the handles, I let it soak for an hour or so and then I wipe away all excess oil from all surfaces. If you have covered the tools well, you should be able to wipe ...


5

I wouldn't paint, it will scrape off quickly. Standard advice on preventing rust that I've heard is to take a 5 gallon bucket, fill it with sand, and put a quart of oil in it. When you're done with a tool, shove it in the bucket to give it a coating and it won't rust. I don't like the idea of petroleum on my food-garden tools, so I'd substitute some kind ...


5

I am by no means a small engines expert (and someone should correct me if I'm wrong), but as far as I know, running with extra oil will make it smoke while running and may foul up your spark plug (?) which is easily fixable, but won't cause any permanent damage. Running it with less oil than recommended would mean insufficient lubrication and may damage the ...


5

If you look at this manual (I'm not sure if this is your exact mower), there's an exploded parts view on page 86. I suspect it's the bearing labeled "26" in the diagram. There are several of them, so check each location on your mower.


5

I keep a bottle of alcohol in my pruning gear along with silicon spray and files. Clean your pruners between each and every plant. If you've ever killed plants by passing on diseases you'll understand. Some plants have diseases that aren't apparent because of their vigor, genetics or beneficials preventing the disease from causing harm. But easy to pass ...


4

This is a good question, but I'm not sure it's answerable. (Or, if it is answerable, you'll get answers from controlled experiments that will be useless to compare to real-world usage.) I know from experience that my gas-powered saw will run for about 30-40 minutes on a tank of gas when I'm bucking logs for firewood. That's running at more or less full ...


4

Here's what I've done on my two-stroke chainsaw when it has refused to start: Remove and replace spark plug; check the gap. Remove and clean [with an air compressor] or replace air filter. (I just blow it out, I haven't yet replaced the filter.) If you see gunk when you're removing these parts, clean it up. (Because of all of the sawdust and bar oil, the ...


4

Use a fuel stabilizer when you buy gas, so it won't varnish in the carburetor.


3

Sure, if you want. Hit them with some rust primer every so often.


3

I've had good luck with simply adding a bit of Sta-bil to a full tank, run it for a couple of minutes, and then parking it. I usually wait until the spring to change the oil, clean/replace the spark plug, sharpen the blade, etc although you do want to make sure that there's no buildup of grass or other debris that will hold moisture against the body.


3

a couple tips: don't lose those nuts; remember the direction the rope is wound; and finally your last step should be making a good stopper knot that won't pull through or come undone at the handle. Make sure there is a little tension on the rope where you make the knot.


3

I would say that it is worth the time, based on my sharpening experiences. Here is a nice e-how article on the process that breaks it down better than I ever could. I've only sharpened trimmers a few times, but I have sharpened chainsaw chains by hand quite a bit with a round file and it didn't take long at all. Just a bit of patience. The trick is to be ...


2

Regular maintenance of a lawnmower includes fuel checks, cleaning (dirt and dust) and oil check. If you had your lawnmower in a self storage unit for awhile, check for rust on the blades, wheels and motor. Any major rust in these areas means your lawnmower is as good as junk. However, light rust can be removed with a rust remover and always make sure all ...


2

Use wax paper to clean the metal parts. Then you can put furniture paste wax on them to prevent rust. The handles, if they're not too far gone, can be renewed with boiled linseed oil.


2

I also travel frequently and use the "Hydrospike". Basically it siphons water up from a container into a clay spike, which slowly diffuses the water. The flow can be "regulated" by the number of spikes you use ;-) The physics doesn't quite make sense to me, but against all odds, it seems to work quite well. The longest trip I've used it for was 10 days, with ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible