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19

Take a look at this question, Nothing will grow where tree was, here on SE. Quote: Pouring chemicals (poison) on the stump is going to speed up the breakdown (decompose) process, but it's still going to take at least a year or two. If the stump isn't that big, it's much better to get it pulled or to simply dig it out (that normally results in a good ...


15

I initially tried gasoline (bad idea.) Was shocked at the initial flame when I lit it. Other than that, it just burned for 15 min and didn't do anything. What did work was charcoal from my grill. After making dinner on the grill, I'd put the still hot charcoals on the stump. Did that three times and it ate away most all of the stump. Cheap and ...


13

First, call the stump grinders and ask them what they used. Then you can make a more informed decision: Option 1: Wait. Depending on what they used, the potency will dissipate over time and you'll eventually be able to plant something in the area. Option 2: Build up the soil above that area -- make a raised bed. Don't mix the new soil you add on top with ...


11

Fire is a great idea. I highly recommend it. I had a stump in my yard a few years ago and a friend lit a small fire on top (enough to burn for an hour or so) and just left it. The fire burned out the stump and all the roots which subsequently collapsed. There was a bit of a hole to be filled, but it was gone within 48 hours and about 20 minutes of light ...


11

I concur with the comments that grinding is the best route to go. Chemicals are overpriced for what they are and toxic to the immediate soil. hauling them out with a tractor or bobcat works but leaves a huge hole in the ground that must be back filled grinding allows you to set how deep you go and provides that instant "problem solved" look Of course ...


11

As Mike Perry pointed out, this question on this site is a good first hand account of what happens when you use stump removal chemicals. All that most chemicals provide is a very high amount of nitrogen. They're just glorified, over priced fertilizers and I'll bet that most products have potassium nitrate as their main ingredient. Typically several deep ...


8

Did you ask them to pour chemicals (poison) into your landscape? If yes, lesson learnt. If no, they should be called back and instructed to clean up the area properly, at no cost to yourselves. Stump grinding is ok! but growing anything it that area is going to be difficult until the remaining stump and roots breakdown (decompose) naturally. Depending on ...


6

Depending on the type of tree and your location, drilling holes and filling them with mushroom spore plugs might also work. The mushrooms will help to break down the stump, and you can harvest mushrooms from it in the meantime.


6

I've chipped the main roots and stump with an axe to speed the natural decay. Micro-organisms can infiltrate the cuts ans colonize the wood. Indeed rotting happened in 3 years.


5

This is one job that I get to do quite often each year. Grass doesn't grow as well in wood chips as it does in topsoil, so be prepared for some digging. I find that a pitchfork is often easier to use than a spade shovel. Tree stumps often have a surprisingly high quantity of chips once ground out. Be prepared to take more than an hours work on just this ...


4

If you have an auger, drill a bunch of holes...I mean saturate the stump with holes, fill those holes and cover the stump with manure. It will still take a long time to rot, but this will speed it up a lot.


4

Landscaping features are anything decorative in the vicinity that could be damaged by all the equipment. This includes things like rocks, bird feeders/houses/baths, edging, statues, that type of thing. Even small shrubs and perennials can be temporarily moved. Also, if you happen to have landscape fabric down around the area where they will be grinding, move ...


4

In terms of replanting, once you've cleared away any debris left behind (there's usually a fair bit, and if you haven't requested they take all debris away, there'll be a lot), dug the area over and added something humus rich, a week later and you can replant. As for 'landscaping features' I'm not sure what they mean by that, and that's something you ought ...


4

If you leave the stump to dry out it will be easier to burn. The amount and type of sap will also determine your success. Stumps can take days of burning before the fire burns out, so make sure you put some rope or something around it to avoid injury.


4

You can go to Home Depot and rent an easy to use tree stump grinder for $70 for 4 hours...trust me this is the way to go. It'll be gone in no time with no burning or digging. Afterwards you have free mulch that you can recycle. Good luck!


4

I know that the questions asks about the efficacy of stump removal chemicals, however, I assume the intention is to gain information on removing a stump. A friend of mine just hired a 40lb jack hammer from Home Depot for $55 for 4 hours and said that it was the perfect tool to quickly and efficiently dig up his stump. Personally I thought this was an ...


3

I know of three ways to chemically reduce a stump: Sodium hydroxide -- Drano/lye. You are doing the same process as making paper, but more slowly. The very high pH tends to make clay into rock, and will take a long time to wash free. Fertilizer. Wood is composed mostly of cellulose and lignan. Neither has significant nitrogen. Adding nitrogen is ...


3

This worked well for me. First DON'T use Gas. Diesel or Kerosene much better with higher flash point. Now I used a 1" diameter auger bit in my drill and made some core holes about 4 inches and about 14 inches down (my auger bit is 18"). Fill the holes with diesel and cork them. wait a couple days and fill them again. Come back after another couple of ...


3

You can pull them out with a car jack. You need to secure a chain to the jack and the stump and have a thick board for the jack to sit on. I've heard of this to take out fence posts. I have never tried either, but it makes sense theoretically.


3

If you have deer in your yard... Drill holes in stump as deep and as large as possible. Fill holes with table salt and water in with warm water. Put salt lick (block) on stump. Wait for deer to find it. Continue adding granular salt to stump and dissolving it with warm water. Wait a little longer until they are frequent visitors and enjoying the salt ...


3

If you can't dig it out, your best luck will be had using a pruning saw and taking it off at ground level. To keep it from coming back, drill small holes straight into the stems, going in at least an inch, but not going through the wood into soil. You can then use a 50% glyphosate mixture and fill the holes, being careful not to spill much on the surrounding ...


2

High nitrogen fertilizer in the already mentioned, drilled holes. The StumpBGone stuff you can get at greenhouse supply stores is usually nothing but potassium nitrate, so if you've already got a high nitrogen fertilizer, you can just use that. Keeping the stump damp will help fungus fluorish in the high nitrogen environment. Sugar is just carbon, hydrogen ...


2

You haven't said whether the stumps are still live or not - if they've recently been cut down and not treated with a stump killer, they will regrow, so that's the first thing to do. After that, there's not much you can do to speed things up other than leave fungal activity to do its thing, the majority of which goes on underground, where you can't see it ...


2

The chips can take years to fully decompose and this process will take the nitrogen in the surrounding substrate. The more nitrogen, the faster decomposition of the chips. My advice: Remove all the chips (if you like store it for later use as mulch). Cover the hole with a very similar substrate to which surrounds (this is to maintain the same water ...


1

The chinaberry tree is considered invasive in many states and I note with horror that even with seedlings "any root fragments left behind will resprout". This site recommends cutting and then a herbicide and then goes on to caution that seeds can lie dormant for many years before sprouting. You could get a chainsaw and make a new cut lower down on the stump ...


1

My favorite (but not in too much hurry) method is a simple pile of manure completely covering the stump. It provides nitrogen, but perhaps more importantly also a damp environment to promote rotting. Most stumps are well-broken down within 2-3 years via this method. If feeling some slight sense of urgency I'll pickaxe them (breaking up the partially rotted ...



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