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5

I'm sorry I don't know the cause of your damage, but I have a lot of experience with sedums, and can reassure you that a healthy plant can grow even if the top is damaged, dead, or broken off; and even if the roots have come out of the soil and completely dried up. I live in Massachusetts, growing zone 6, (-10°F, -23°C) and have a number of varieties of ...


3

As a rule of thumb, you should not prune the roots of a mature tree closer then 3 times the diameter I.e. 6 feet in this instance, and you should not prune any roots when the tree is on a lean. So, it seems you need an arborist to come and inspect the damage.


7

You don't say what part of the world you're in, and that makes a difference to legal procedures, but if the tree is close enough to damage your house should it fall, here in the UK, I'd advise my buildings insurance company of what's happened, and hopefully, they'd either arrange for a Tree surgeon to attend and assess the situation, or pay for a tree ...


3

If you're expecting a piece of cut trunk from an ash tree to develop roots, I'm sorry to tell you it's not going to. Now it's been cut, it's in the process of drying out, so effectively, its already dead. Which is probably just as well, because if its an ordinary ash, they have large composite leaves, and are not ideal subjects for bonsai. You can grow your ...


3

Listen, if roots are infiltrating, you least expensive solution is to dig it out, retrench, and put in a new drain. You may also wish to trim back the roots, and make a wider trench with heavier gravel at the point where the tree is infiltrating to slow it down. Why is this cheaper? Because it's going to happen again and again, and you are going to be ...



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