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1

Alternatively to the other answer, Spathiphyllum can be divided - this is where a sharp bread knife comes in handy. I'd cut the rootball in half and pot up both sections separately, keeping it well watered till it recovers. If you don't want two plants, pot them both anyway and bin one if it's not growing as well as the other.


3

They should be spaced 12 inches apart to allow for the plant's width of 10 inches as it grows to its height of about 12 inches, so I'm not sure where you get 6 inches apart from - are you growing a particular named variety of this plant that's smaller? Even if you are growing one that requires a 6 inch spacing, growing them an inch apart means none of them ...


2

I've done this with members of the aroid family of which spaths are members. soak the rootball before repotting to the leaves have a good supply of water take sharp knife and cut the bottom one quarter of the roots off using the same sharp knife make a series of vertical cuts around the root ball and remove and loose roots repot in a pot of one size ...


2

That seems a little tall for an apple tree - if its not on a dwarfing rootstock, it should be kept pruned back. That said, it doesn't sound as if the apple tree is a likely culprit, though its not impossible. If you're on clay soil, then removing a tree can cause as many problems as it solves - take advice from a building surveyor.


2

Which plant you're talking about definitely makes a difference. How careful you have to be with the roots depends on the species. Some are very sensitive and some are not. With tomatoes, if your plants are healthy and are not tiny, you can just pull one of them up like a weed and repot it. (Tomatoes are very lenient with their roots.) Then water the old one ...


1

The older and wiser approach here is to face up to making a mistake and kill the weaker one (or one at random if they are the same) so that the other may live with minimal setback. The younger and not quite as wise yet approach might try cutting the root mass in half with a sharpish knife, presuming that the majority of the roots for each plant will be in ...



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