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2

For a 5x5 foot (or even meter) plot I'd just use something like this: To rip out the clumps - rototillers can be remarkably less capable of dealing with heavy sod than you'd like to think, and the small area makes renting one seem like a waste of money (IMHO) - this type of tool makes it easy to stand up and rip out the roots of difficult clumping weeds, ...


2

It's because when they dig the plant, the dirty ragged cut the digger leaves on the roots is left when the plant goes to storage. The roots on your plant used to be a lot longer, but (of course) when they were dug, the roots had to be cut. That's why trimming off the last 1/2 - 1 inches of root can be good for the plant, sort of like trimming dead/ragged ...


2

It encourages new root growth which is important to the plant's survival in the first several weeks. It's common for bare-root stock of many sorts to suggest trimming the roots. If you don't trim the roots, the plant has less impetus to push out fresh roots. That's all. It's like pruning the tops, if you don't prune you get leggy plants with less fresh ...


4

I have no idea, never heard of it, usually the only time you need to trim roots is if they are damaged, when you may take off those parts affected. It is, though, common to be advised to prune back the canes (topgrowth) to 6-8 inches if this has not been done prior to despatch. I certainly wouldn't advise cutting back roots for plants which are going to be ...


8

Is leaving them in there better or worse than taking them out? In a pot, definitely take them out if you can. They will put out chemicals while decomposing (usually) that slow down the new plants (a kind of allelopathy). In a garden bed, usually this process only takes a couple weeks. Also, in a pot, the roots have the potential to mess with water ...


3

After a plant is removed/dies, how long does it take for the roots to break down? Really, depends on conditions. They can last years (dead) in a free draining mix of peat in a pot, but can rot in weeks in a healthy, damp, garden loam. Usually, the healthier the soil, the faster it will break down roots. Non soil growing mediums usually take much ...


1

Depends on the plant and conditions. Everything between a couple weeks for a fibrous root system to a few years for woody tap roots. Wet and high pH will cause faster decomposing, low pH tends to preserve. Yes they will provide nutrition depending on the plant, and length of time to decompose will also affect whether it's even useful levels of nutrient or ...


3

If the root was 32" out from the tree and in the top foot or two of soil, it probably wasn't a mortal injury. Don't mess with the tree for a while, and definitely protect the other root- allow the tree to recover a bit. If the stub of the root is still exposed, or if you could get to it, you can cover the cut surface in rooting hormone to help it get back ...


3

Ok, I'll break this down and answer what I can. I haven't extensively grown cucurbits from cuttings, but I've grown pumpkins, cucumbers, watermelons, and other melons this way. I've found that I can establish a cutting faster than a seed, but there are also drawbacks IME. What are the practical differences between cucumbers grown from seed and cucumbers ...



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