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Whether these are the roots of your tree or some other tree does not really matter. Most tree roots grow within six inches of the surface. For sake of peace with your neighbour follow these easy steps: sharpen a spade or shovel dig a slit trench approximately six inches deep along the property line with your neighbour. Sever roots cleanly. place a root ...


0

The engineering approach: 2 pi R says you have a circumference of about 18.8 meters at 3 meters radius from the trunk. You're going to put in a 0.6 meter post foundation. That's about 1/31st of the circumference at that distance, or roughly 3.2% Considered as area of roots (for a 3-meter radius disk) it's more like 1.2% I doubt the tree will even ...


4

It partly depends on the size of the tree (some Japanese maples mature far larger than others, and at 5m tall, there are a lot of possibilities.), but at 3 meters from the trunk, you are more likely to damage a larger tree than a smaller one. In any case, you are unlikely to kill the tree, even if you do cut some roots. That will be such a small percentage ...


4

It's anybody's best guess really - where the roots of a tree spread to is very much down to local conditions, and the only way you're going to find out is to start digging the hole. At a distance of three metres from the trunk, it's likely you will come across some root material, and losing a little of it shouldn't cause too much damage, particularly at this ...


3

Bulbs Bulbs are plant storage organs generally grown underground, consisting of a short stem (the basal plate), from which grow overlapping, swollen leaves or leaf bases. The top growth emerges from the bulb center. Here's an example: Corms Corms are not made up of leaves, but a vertical swollen compact stem, and as such are solid. The corm is protected ...


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Yes, it's possible, if the roots are still live, not dried out, frozen, or partly decayed. Also, some people spray food-grade roots with a growth suppressor to keep them from sprouting in the store. If this is the case, growth may be non-existent, slow, or stunted. you just have to try it. Here's what to do: Galangal (Alpinia galanga) As a Houseplant: Use ...


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Depends how long it's been in the fridge and what condition it's in. Only way to know is to try. Friend of mine offered me three kinds of hops (Humulus Lupus) once - unfortunately, he'd only planted the Fuggles, and had tossed the other two in the fridge for a Looooooong time. So, I have a Fuggles from him, and the other two were moldy masses of festering ...



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