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20

Check out this video. I use these techniques with my tomato plants with good results. Summary: Leave two leaders (main stems). Prune all other suckers. Start when suckers 3" length. Prune every week to 10 days. Don't prune determinate types ("bush" tomatoes). Don't prune when wet to avoid spreading disease. 30 days before frost, prune tips of leaders to ...


15

The type of pruning you're looking for is called crown reduction. The main purpose of this is to reduce the height of the tree by cutting down its crown, as explained here. Since you say your tree is 30+ feet high, it is advisable to get professional help instead of venturing out to do this on your own. Note that the pruning cuts that will be made are ...


14

Depending on your location you will want to prune any time from January to March (or June to August in the southern hemisphere). If you are in Florida a good time to prune is generally end of January or beginning of February. Look for any dead branches and get rid of these first. You will then want to trim branches that are towards the middle of the tree, ...


13

If a house plant is in reasonable light then when it is watered it should receive enough so that water comes out the bottom of the pot. If a plant has really dried out then you may need to let it sit in a small amount of water so capillary action can re wet the entire root ball. Normally though you should not let a plant sit in water. Although it varies ...


11

We only have one rose and it was already planted when we moved in, so practical experience is limited and initial shape left something to be desired. However, I followed the advice in Neil Sperry's Complete Guide to Texas Gardening and this seems to work. It is a bit of a traditional gardening book, and a bit proscriptional ("there is only one way and it is ...


10

If you're buying all new shrubs and trees, look into varieties that grow very slowly or dwarf varieties of which there are many; these usually need very little pruning and allow your garden to keep a more natural look.


10

Fig trees unlike a lot of other trees out there do not mind being pruned a LOT. What I mean by that is you should not be afraid to prune this type of tree. If they have a really good root system they can withstand a harsh pruning (harsh in a good way :)). Within the first year, provided that your fig tree has established itself is a prime time to prune. ...


9

Improper pruning can shorten a tree's life. However you would have to work really hard to damage a willow with bad pruning. Here's why: Willows grow fast they will bud from old wood, even really old wood they are a messy tree, commonly dropping leaves and branches ==> they are used to breaks or cuts in the branch structure willows have been coppiced for ...


8

I would prune the tree in early-ish spring, whenever that is in your time zone, since that gives new shoots (which you want) time to ripen in preparation for winter or hot weather. As JonH said, just prune for shape and structure and health: maybe have a couple sturdy branches to establish the frame, etc. etc, have an open center, get rid of diseased ...


8

The only way to "limit" the growth of a tree / shrub is to prune / trim / hedge the plant. There is also another possibility but it may have the consequences of actually killing off the plant. That is to dig a hole maybe 1-2 ft around and depth wise for the plant. Put in some good soil but around this soil fill with clay / rock. This prohibits the roots ...


8

Edit: after the information from David that the tree produced heavily this year, renovation may be a practical course of action. You may get a better answer from someone else, but I'd suggest that you should cut it down and plant a new tree. Peach trees are not long-lived -- a 20-25 year old tree is ready for retirement. Production typically drops off at ...


8

Foxgloves are (in Seattle and England) very hardy perennials. You can easily trim the stalk back to the base and the plant will come back fine next year. The only thing I've ever had to be cautious about is the fact that foxgloves produce a large quantity of seed, and they have been pretty good about sowing themselves around my garden. There are times ...


8

Cherry trees grow with a single upward leader, all other branches come out sideways from this. When the tree gets to the desired height, simply prune off the growing tip of the central leader. The tree with no longer gain height but will instead put its efforts into sideways branching, flowers and fruit. Cherry trees are susceptible to diseases if pruned ...


8

This is the advice given by the Royal Horticultural Society: Training Single fence This system is ideal for summer-fruiting raspberries in a small garden. Drive 2.5m (8ft) long and 75mm (3in) diameter posts into the ground to a depth of 75cm (30in) at 5m (15ft) intervals. Stretch 12 gauge (3.5mm) galvanized wire between the posts at ...


8

It really comes down to the type of tree eg Fruit, Deciduous, Evergreen, etc then the specific species as to when is (considered) the best time of year to prune... The same is true for plants. As a very general rule of thumb, prune in: Dead of Winter. Or Spring (exact time during Spring will depend on what it is you're pruning) through to early Summer. ...


7

The "recommended limit" depends on who you talk to. I think it comes down to how obsessed you want to be with managing your tomatoes. In "How should I prune my vine tomatos?", there's a video in which they suggest you should limit growth to the main branch and one sucker. In one of Eliot Coleman's books, he talks about growing a single vine up to the roof ...


7

Don't prune unless the vine is dormant. What your friend was probably meaning was to snap off some of the grape clusters (fruit) so that the remaining grapes will be sweeter. This only works if the grape plant produces more fruit than it can supply with adequate sugar. Also, (common sense) removing fruit after it is well developed will have little impact ...


7

Depending where you Are from you can prune in early spring before any new leaves or flowers come out. If you are in a very warm climate you can also prune after all of the fruit is taken in late fall. Prune or cut at an angle to avoid damaging the tree and prune any dead branches.


7

Since you've already accepted a nicely sourced answer, I'll contribute some unsubstatiated tradition (i.e. what I was paid 5 cents an hour to do as a kid). Prune near the end of the cold season, not in the summer. Prune so that you leave 4 buds from the old trunk. -My Grandpa John Montgomery


7

So you know, I do not have personal experience with this. I did, however, find an excellent website which I suspect you'd really prefer to have me summarize. :) It's year-old growth which produces flowers and then grapes. Two years or older wood does not produce fruit, and will have loose, shedding bark that the younger canes will not have. Grape vines ...


7

It's a good idea to prune them now before the normal pruning time. They are not going to be useful for the future of the vine or fruit in the short term so they are a waste of energy that would go to other parts of the vine.


7

As a general rule, you can prune tomatoes every 7-10 days. Yes, it is possible to over prune the plant. If you remove too many stems, you will reduce production. And you don't need to prune a determinate tomato -- they will stop growing at a certain height. I wouldn't prune yours. At 6 months old, I'd expect it to be much larger than 18". Is it fruiting? ...


7

What to prune is a lot more important than how often. If you know what to prune, you can't prune too frequently. Then you're better off pruning when sucker growth (and whatever else you want to prune) is small, so you reduce the amount of wasted growth. So it really depends on how fast the plants are growing. In July, if the weather is good, and ...


7

I don't want to seem to be against the "do-it-yourself" crowd, but at 60' tall the only safe answer is to hire an arborist. Consider paying a professional to do the job of cutting off the second trunk versus the alternatives: possible personal injury while climbing the tree possible damage to your property, or someone else's property, from what falls ...


6

First, a disclaimer: I haven't pruned a cherry tree (yet); this year will be the first :) But I did do some research when I bought them and here are the important things to keep in mind. Keep strong, firm lateral branches that stick out from the central trunk and prune the smaller ones. Cherry trees need sunlight and good air circulation around them and so ...


6

You can train trees however you want (except perhaps make them grow underground!) if you start at a very young age. The trees will need to be trained constantly (i.e., if you miss for a couple of weeks to a month, you'll find that it's harder to bend them the way you want) till they reach the desired shape and after that, you can maintain the shape by ...


6

If you are fertilizing this tree, I'd recommend that you stop, it doesn't seem to need any more! From what I can tell from the photos, it looks like this tree doesn't get full sun -- it looks like there are other trees that might be slightly shading it. This could cause some of the vigorous vertical growth that you see -- it's trying to get up into the sun. ...


6

You need only prune out the spent flower stalks. Aside from removing old leaves and flower stalks, yuccas do not require any pruning. If you need to prune to control height, prune in the spring before new growth begins. If the plant is well established, you can cut it off at any height (including ground level), and it will begin two to four new stems from ...


6

As @Grady says, removing leaves could result in more harm than good. Some people prune the tops of tomatoes and peppers to keep them within a certain size. I don't do this with my peppers - they have space, and I just let them grow. More plant = more peppers down the road. In the case of peppers (and most fruiting plants), removing fruit can enhance growth. ...


6

Depends on the variety of tree. If its a Prunus species, then wound paint may help to prevent silverleaf infection, but otherwise, wound paint is no longer recommended, since research shows that it does not prevent or stop any infection of the wounded area, and in some cases appears to be detrimental to the healing process. When you prune the tree is much ...



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