Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

Vegetable oil does not work well because it beads up on top of the water and does not spread across the surface. It also goes rancid. Mosquito larva breathe air through a little tube while they float on the surface, so "oil" remedies are designed to cut off their air supply. You can try a horticultural spray oil. It only takes a few drops to form a ...


17

I believe those are aphids and I had the same issue. My solution was to take the pot of basil and put it outside where native predators (tiny green grasshopper-type insects) had a feast. They also attacked my parsley and cilantro, but vanished once the plants were moved to the great outdoors. I assume the same predators took care of the problem as ...


16

I have a similar problem with these tiny white flies. It considerably weakened some Shrubby Cinquefoil (Potentilla) seedlings I was growing in pots in the garden and is still feeding on them. Although you haven't posted a photo, given your description, I'm still confident that the insect that attacked your basil is the same as the one I have been doing ...


11

Although millipedes can be quite beneficial in the compost pile, in that they help to break down the contents, they also feed on vegetables and can destroy seedlings, as you point out; the few, small benefits they confer are far outweighed by the the harm they can cause, particularly when their numbers are high - see Millipedes eating my vegetable seedlings ...


11

In my areas of knowledge (Seattle and London), the ants don't make a real difference one way or the other. They won't damage your plants, nor will they give them much help. Of course, I can only speak to the small black ants, but as far as I know even the larger, more aggressive ants are more of a threat to the gardener to the garden. My sister lives in ...


10

When I put in artichokes, the little black ants decided to 'farm' aphids on them, which really did a number on the young plants. If they aren't doing that, then maybe you don't have to worry about them.


9

The appearance of the soil surface in your photos leads me to think that over-watering may be the cause of the mold/fungus; a constantly wet growing medium provides ideal conditions for mold to develop. The soil needs to dry out a little between waterings, so that it is only slightly damp to the touch, and never wet. The slight browning of the stems where ...


9

Spiders eat meat (bugs), hence the web to trap them, and have no interest in eating plants. If you're seeing spiders, you probably have bugs that they're eating. If you remove the spiders, the bugs are free to eat the plants unencumbered. I would leave them. The caveat to this would be if the spider is a black widow, though its hard to imagine a black ...


8

Fortunately, I have never had to do battle with millipedes, so I can't suggest a remedy based on personal experience. However, a quick online search has come up with this article which suggests the following control measures: Remove as much garden debris as possible, since this is an ideal breeding ground for them Drench the soil where they are with this ...


7

Slugs are considered a pest. I don't know of any benefits they provide. See answers to this question for ways to deal with them.


7

Q. Are you 100% sure it's millipedes causing the "real" damage? Could it instead be something like cutworms causing the "real" damage and the millipedes are just feasting on the remains? To check if you're dealing with millepedes (which tend to be dark in colour), squash one, if there is a strong "stinky" smell after doing so, then you have millipedes. Q. ...


7

Here are some often repeated remedies. However ducks are like people with individual likes and dislikes. What might terrify one duck could be "ho-hum" to another. a plastic owl: usually available at birding stores, sometimes outdoor/hunting stores. Get the better quality ones with a head that moves or the deluxe versions with wings that move. (I'm not ...


7

Use an ant moat. You could build one yourself but the ones you can purchase are inexpensive and essentially consist of a cup that holds water and creates a barrier between the shepherd's hook and the hummingbird feeder. The ants won't be able to cross the barrier - at least they don't on ours. That style - same style I have - can leak a bit and if the ...


6

When the corn is about 1-2 weeks from being ready for human consumption put a battery powered radio tuned to an all night talk radio station in your corn patch. Music does not work. The raccoons will avoid the "humans" for a while. You have to time this carefully to your corn crop because after a couple of weeks the 'coons will figure that those voices ...


6

This won't treat your soil, but introducing Ladybirds(we call them ladybugs here) may help per this answer. They are available in the UK as larvae through Amazon in more controlled quantities than they are in the states (where you can buy about 1500 fully grown live ones for that price). However you may be able to find a garden center or local agricultural ...


6

I've had a pair of mallard ducks come to my yard. (Unlike you though I welcomed them...) In any case - they did not take residence - they just liked to visit often. I wish they had stayed to lay eggs - and nest They did not damage my garden They returned the next year and hung about - no nests, no "angry duck mom". If you don't want wildlife perhaps ...


6

This article goes into extensive details on electric fencing. Fencing that is not electrified should be at least 8 feet tall. A detailed description is found here. Sadly these solutions require time, money and a post hole digger or a tractor. Deer pose a different problem for every gardener. A hungry deer will go to far greater lengths to eat your ...


6

Assuming that you have not been bringing wood pallets from China to your home there isn't anything you could have done. This website from Illinois agriculture is informative. The ash borer is spreading slowly throughout North America and the only solution we have is to cut down ash trees. Thousands have been cut where I live and many more will be as the ...


6

Do you have grubs? Last year I had a lot of grubs. For a few days, I'd go out and find that my basil had been dug up -- nothing was eaten, just a bunch of digging around that happened to damage the plants. I think it was a skunk -- I saw the skunk one day at dusk, not in the garden, but heading towards the fence. I also saw what I believe to be skunk turds ...


6

You might have a case of ants farming the aphids. If this is the case, tackling the aphids will not likely be productive as the ants will just replace the aphids. I suspect you will need to attack the ant nest directly. The suggestion I thought would work best from the above link was pouring boiling chili water down the nest.


6

Assuming this cherry tree is not a Japanese species, for these are rarely attacked, this looks like Cherry Blackfly. Its a sap feeding aphid, Myzus cerasi, which overwinters as eggs on fruiting cherries and some ornamental species such as Prunus avium and P. padus. Fruiting trees used to be sprayed with a tar oil wash in winter to control the eggs, but a lot ...


5

The ants will feed aphids! When you see aphids it would be too late to save your plants, especially herbs. My suggestion is to use ant bait to kill them. Just place the toxic bait in their daily path. A few years ago, my home had ants appearing from time to time and they were so annoying. I used an ant bait, mixed with bread and sugar, to attract them. ...


5

*NORTH AMERICAN (Check to ensure predatory insects can be introduced in the UK) There is a pretty good research article from Cornell University. It does not specifically list pesticides that you could place around the base, however, there may be a few other options that you will find suitable. Such as inducing a predator insect to attack the beetle: ...


5

Given the time of year, the insect's appearance in the close-up and the fact that you live in Scotland, the damage is almost certainly being caused by the infamous Scottish midge - which has spoiled so many of my holidays in the Highlands! I have never experienced this problem myself, but I have done a quick online search and the following advice, which ...


5

That is a Capnodis tenebrionis (L.). - Peach Flatheaded Rootborer. They seem to be fairly problematic, and HIGHLY UNWANTED. They are very destructive to the plant. Larvae and adults damage saplings and young stone-fruit cultures. Adults devour cortex, leafstalks, and fruit buds. Orchard bushes lose their leaves after C. tenebrionis mass abundance. ...


5

Slugs are one the most common garden pests. If not eliminated they can do much damage. They do most of their damage at night when you are not watching. If you see one then surely there are many that you don't see. There are many products on the market for slug control. These are mostly baits. The easiest ways are available around the house. The first is ...


5

Look at the stem, down near the base. Do you see some distinctive brown-orange sawdust-like material? If so, that's called frass, and your plant is being destroyed by one or more squash vine borers. The wikipedia article is really good, and shows pictures (at the bottom) of what to look for. We've tried killing the grubs in the stem, with a hatpin and ...


5

A light spunbonded poly agricultural fabric, placed over the patch after pollination, might keep some of these insects off of your ripening fruit. It acts as a physical barrier without weighing down the plants. Rain and most of the light pass right on through. I've used it in this manner to keep aphids off my coles and other greens.


5

I agree - it's leafminers. There are several kinds of insects with larvae that do this sort of damage, but one thing they all have in common is they are rapidly becoming resistant to the usual chemical controls. Non-chemical controls consist of removing infected leaves, and/or plants, keeping dead leaves and debris scrupulously picked up, rotation of ...


5

Cats will also generally avoid the largest sizes of bark mulch - say, 3-4 inches in diameter or larger. They have a hard time standing on it because it is "tippy" and an even harder time scratching in it, so they tend to find other places to do their business when they can. So if you will use this size, or put a layer of the largest size bark mulch you can ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible