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11

Looking at the video, it looks like a pretty typical whitefly. They aren't uncommon on tomatoes (or in your garden in general), and they typically do the most damage by transmitting disease. UC Davis has a good summary page: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r783301211.html From my own personal experience, there are three things that can help. The first is ...


10

That looks like the worst case of scale I've ever seen. Are the tops of the leaves sticky, and is there more of it on the central rib of each leaf (top and/or bottom)? If so, that pretty much clinches it. Yes, you definitely need to treat it. You'll find some advice here, but maybe someone has better advice for such a horrible infestation. What I would ...


10

This site describes (with copious pictures) the problem you are having. A possible solution from the site: Andrea from LifestyleBlock suggested I try using a solution of apple cider vinegar and spray the strawberries several times a day. Since I only had white vinegar I used that instead. The mix I did was 1 tablespoon vinegar to a litre of water. For 5 ...


7

Options: .22 (check local ordinances...killing them may not be allowed) trap and release (release far away...again, check local ordinances) metal mesh. Squirrels don't like digging through wire. This is a great technique for protecting flower bulbs...not as practical for a yard. repellent (the stuff I've used that seems to work OK is a mix of garlic, ...


6

Earwigs like to come out at night when you're not looking and eat flowers and new growth. Remove mulch like bark or piles of leaves from the immediate area. a thin layer of diatomaceous earth around the basil will discourage them. However this will have to be redone after a rainfall Longer term solutions are consider where you have planted basil as ...


6

My strawberries were damaged in the same way as yours, last year. The culprits proved to be Strawberry Seed Beetles (black, about 1cm long), which were living among some weeds nearby. They remove seeds from the outside of the fruit and also eat into it. I had netted the bed to protect it from birds, but had failed to weed around it - and these beetles are ...


6

This won't treat your soil, but introducing Ladybirds(we call them ladybugs here) may help per this answer. They are available in the UK as larvae through Amazon in more controlled quantities than they are in the states (where you can buy about 1500 fully grown live ones for that price). However you may be able to find a garden center or local agricultural ...


6

I've had this happen many times over the years. In my case, it was flocks of crows tearing up the lawn looking for grubs. It's almost comical how they rip out a piece of sod and toss it over their shoulder. Almost. On the other hand, the grubs can't be good either. You might want to try some grub killer.


5

You can make your own all natural squirrel repellent at home that won't (shouldn't) kill the grass. In a 2oz pot of water add the following ingredients. 2 tablespoons black pepper 2 tablespoons cayenne pepper one chopped Jalapeno pepper one chopped onion Boil for 20 minutes and then let cool with the lid on it. Strain liquid threw a cheese cloth into a ...


5

Best guess based on the video is that you have some sort of aphid. Is it soft bodied? A close-up, in-focus photo of the insect would be helpful. If they are aphids, you can knock them off with a spray of water, or spray with a dilute solution of soap (about 1 tablespoon of dish soap to a gallon of water).


5

*NORTH AMERICAN (Check to ensure predatory insects can be introduced in the UK) There is a pretty good research article from Cornell University. It does not specifically list pesticides that you could place around the base, however, there may be a few other options that you will find suitable. Such as inducing a predator insect to attack the beetle: ...


4

As it turns out, the answer was as Mike Perry suggested in the comments on the question: wait and see. One year after I posted this question, the previously "bad" Lupin is growing and flowering strongly, while the "good" Lupin is a lot smaller than last year, but otherwise looks healthy:


4

Lupins are notoriously susceptible to slugs and snails, which never go further than they have to from their retreat. My guess would be that somewhere near the lupin that is being eaten a snail lurks beneath a flowerpot or a brick.


4

I volunteered at a heritage garden (shameless plug for a place worth visiting) that had old crab apple and their bark did exfoliate or peel in little scales about two inches high by an inch wide. This is normal for mature crab apple and apple trees. What is in your pictures doesn't look like a mature tree with a trunk over eight inches in diameter and ...


4

My best guess is plum curculio (see Figure 2, looks like yours). "The Organic Gardener's Handbook of Natural Pest and Disease Control" (p170) suggests spreading a cloth on the ground and tapping the tree -- twice a day -- with a padded mallet. Gather up the bugs that fall and destroy. Or pasture your chickens in the orchard... Or they suggest spraying ...


4

Last year we grew chives right next to basil in our square foot garden and had absolutely no pest problems near the chives. I am not sure if chives repel earwigs though. I did find this article however.


4

I use chicken wire to keep squirrels out of my garden. They are always digging holes there and burying acorns. One thing I've noticed: they always go for open soil, and once plants are established there they don't seem to dig and bury stuff anymore. So you might try the mesh until you can get other vegetation better established. I was going to put mesh ...


4

The long split probably is canker, Maples are susceptible to it. The full name of one variety that affects Maples is Eutypella Canker. There are other species specific fungal cankers as well. It's a fungal oozing infection that gets into wounds and kills the cambium layer. I would have a tree professional have a look at it as it will affect the future ...


3

I have not grown Kohleria, but I have grown other gesneriads, namely Gloxinia, Streptocarpus, and Saintpaulia (African Violets). These plants all strongly dislike having cold water sprinkled over their leaves. Judging from the character and distribution of the spotting on the plant pictured, I would guess that is the problem. Watering the plants from the ...


3

You might try what I did for the same problem with Asiatic Garden Beetles - make covers for the plants out of window screen material. Row cover might be easier to use, but overheating is an issue unless you can find some really lightweight row-cover.


3

Yes, they will be fine. As the energy of the plant was exhausted by producing the bud, it need to store the energy again in the coming year. If the deers didn't ate the whole lily and some leaves are still there, they can do photosynthesis thus storing the nutrient again. And when the next suitable season come, the flower will still bloom. After all, if ...


3

Chili pepper oil or garlic should work in the short term but you can't be out there applying it every other day. I will admit to buying some fox urine from a hunting supply store and that made them scarce for a while. It too suffers from loosing effectiveness unless reapplied on a regular basis. I've found that most rabbits will eat a wide variety of ...


3

Not to worry, this guy does suck on your tree but they rarely do any damage. It is a Spittlebug or Froghopper. Each of those globs is one insect, a nymph that manages to hide himself in...excrement by bubbling a viscous liquid. This is great protection from predators and the elements. Easy to control, just spray with a hard stream of water. Your tree ...


2

Flowers do not need to bloom or be fertilized to do well. They do need good soil, light, and foliage. As long as the deer leave that alone the lilies will be fine. Some plants, like bromeliads, will flower and die so if you remove the flower bud it will last much longer than a plant in the wild. Plants expend an enormous amount of energy on producing ...


2

Does the "nibbling" look like little worm tunnels? I often get this on my spring radishes. The only way I know to deal with it is to harvest them a bit small (3/4-1") before they all get nibbled. I've seen it on the bottoms of the radishes, so I don't think earthing up will help you at all. If it has been the 25-30 days (or whatever it says for time to ...


2

In "The Organic Gardener's Handbook of Natural Disease and Pest Control", p. 265 talks about Flea Beetles. The adults chew holes in the leaves, the larvae feed on the roots. They suggest: using garlic spray or kaolin clay to repel the beetles use parasitic nematodes on the roots to control larvae as a last resort, use Beauveria bassiana or spinosad; you ...


2

Well it looks like adult vine weevil damage. The adults cause these holes by eating on the plants at night, but its the grubs that cause the most damage. They particularly like pots, so assuming these two plants (looks like Euonymus in the last picture) aren't in pots, then you may have an infestation in pots elsewhere. They do also live in soil though. ...


2

I agree with Ed that this is most likely to be a cottony mealybug. You can control this taking a paper towel soaked in dish soap and water and wiping the leaves down. Repeat for every leaf with the symptoms. Check the axils where the leaves join the stems too. After the treatment rinse or spray with water to prevent a soapy buildup repeat every five to ...


2

Scale for sure. Manual removal means wiping them off. Use a wet soapy cloth and rubber gloves as they will become a mushy slime. You might consider purchasing Lady bugs to do some of the work, especially their larvae. Adults will breed and the babies will be extra hungry. Water the foliage before releasing the ladybugs so they can have a drink after their ...


2

I had/have the same problem -as they never go away, keep coming back once they get used to one solution. Check if there are no chipmunks, they might also be digging and making a mess. I have used moth balls and it worked for a while. When they came back to a different area -I have a very small flower bed area- now I'm using the pepper solution w/o jalapenos ...



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