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I wouldn't apply any pesticide for the grubs! I'd take a bucket of soapy water, dump it on a spot in your lawn's soil. If a lot grubs come up for air (there is a threshold that needs to be determined as well as exactly what kind of grub you are dealing with) Once you know if you indeed still have a problem and what your critter is, I'd use a sod cutter, ...


2

Where you are, your grubs (most likely masked chafer), are probably full-size by now, and hanging out down lower than you can efficiently control. I'd wait until April, where (in your area) the larvae will move to the surface, pupate, and fly til near the end of June. Then they'll lay eggs, which will hatch into new larvae. This period (when the ...


1

Tomatoes are here in Germany a quite reliable plant. Planted in a pot and placed either on the windowsill or flanking doors or around your patio, they deter mosquitoes and flies quite well. Obviously not as "guaranteed" as netting or screens and if you leave the light on and the window open, no amount of tomatoes will stop the blighters, but combined with ...


2

Jury's still out on imidproclid soil drench and its effect on bees, but I do know the EU is soon going to ban the use of nicotinoids generally for a minimum of two years, to see what impact it has, or doesn't have, on bees in particular. In general, any nicotinoid based product is likely to be harmful to bees and other pollinators, regardless of how it is ...


3

I believe that (in the first picture) is citrus whitefly (Dialeurodes citri). The small white dots are probably the eggs and larvae (the nymphs fasten to the leaf undersides like scale - see below). These insect suck plant juices, and so are considered pests. The nymph is a flat, elliptical, scale-like object, closely fastened to the underside of a leaf. ...


2

As this is a citrus plant, then likely it is citrus woolly whitefly (aleurothrixus floccosus). They could possibly be nymphs for a scale infection, with adult scales attached to the woody parts, so check those just in case, but it looks more like woolly whitefly. The ants are neither here nor there - they're on the plant because its infested with aphids or ...


5

I love chickens, but let's not forget beneficial nematodes: From The Royal Horticultural Society You can buy pathogenic nematodes, Heterorhabditis megidis or H. bacteriophora, which attack the larvae by infecting them with a fatal bacterial disease. These microscopic animals can be watered into the lawn when the ground is moist and soil temperature ...


8

Those are grubs. There are a lot of kinds of grubs, though, and they look so similar, you often can only tell them apart by their rear ends (seriously, see below) They feed on roots (usually turf, but also trees, perennials, and other plants) as larvae, and then emerge from the ground as beetles, which feed on the leaves. I think they might be masked ...


6

In my experience, planting onions etc around the perimeters isn't very effective. On the other hand, rotation is not only effective, but necessary for a good Integrated Pest Management (IPM) system. It is one of the most effective cultural means of pest/disease prevention, and it also helps the soil maintain a balance, as different plants use vastly ...



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