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Most likely horse chestnut scale, common on large and small Acer varieties in the UK, as well as lime and horse chestnut trees. Although it's unsightly, on large trees it's impractical to treat, and won't kill the tree anyway. On smaller trees, you can use disposable cloths moistened with a little methylated spirits to rub over the affected woody parts, ...


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Where I am the cabbage moth was active the whole summer until mid autumn. In fact people said it was such a good summer that we had several generations of cabbage moths this year. I tried row covers over hoops but found the following issues. I couldn't easily inspect the plants so missed seeing insect damage Moths still managed to get in possibly because ...


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I'm far from expert on the subject, but covering when you set them out is advisable; the white cabbage moths are active in cooler weather, and I'm certain I saw the little beasts the very day transplanted my first cabbages out (into wall-o-waters once I refreshed my information enough to realize that they only take freezing well when mature, not as ...


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I would ignore the spots. I find them regularly, but they doesn't expand, and it seems not to damage the plants or reduce harvest. Just check them regularly, and if they take only a small fraction of surface (other all leaves)) just ignore. On new plants (so with less leaves) I would worry some more, but I have no solution than planting more beans and ...


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It could be snails or slugs. You won't see them during the day but if you can go out after dark with a flash light you may be able to find the culprit (snails, slugs, rabbits, squirrels). You can also put a night vision camera outside if you want to see what is visiting you at night. You can also look below the leaves to see if you can spot any insects ...


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I used to get horribly complicated with these - rural legend had it that you had to cut of the infested branch and burn it. This legend was probably sustained by boys who liked to play with fire. An entomologist friend laughed and said all you need to do is rip the webs open and let birds take care of them. If you have webs, and things moving, you (likely) ...


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When you say 'bugs' I'm assuming you mean larvae, because it sounds like a tent caterpillar infestation. Its easier to wait until the egg masses are laid at the end of summer or in fall and scrape those away, but removing the tents is possible - but best done before the larvae start to feed. the commonest one is Eastern Tent Caterpillar, though it depends ...


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The main natural predators include hedgehogs, some birds (song thrush for instance), some beetles, shrews, frogs, and newts. There's a more comprehensive list in this link http://www.haywardm.supanet.com/predators.html The trouble is, some years when the winter has been mild and damp, the population of both snails and slugs rockets, and there are nowhere ...


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There is a few options I think will come to good use for you: 1) use predatory bugs such as ladybugs, lacewing, or the mealybug destroyer (Cryptolaemus montrouzieri). These guys should help cut them down. 2) Use a bug blaster attachment to a hose and spray them off to reduce the number of bugs. Use leaf shine or neem oil because this discourages future ...


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Few suggestions from someone that had been in a similar situation. I ended up purchasing a closed compost bin to hopefully reduce the bugs. As mentioned, you will have bugs so you can't totally avoid them but reduce it by covering up the bin. Secondly, don't put meat and other kitchen was in the compost. It will likely attract rodents as well.


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Try Diatamaceous Earth (Food Grade) if you are concerned about bugs in the bin. Other options to consider are homemade gnat traps using plastic bottles where you can trap the fungus gnats. You can search online for how to easily make the traps. You can also freeze or microwave the vegetable/fruits before putting them in the bin to destroy the eggs that ...


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The "cabbage worm" which is really a caterpillar of the cabbage moth is best prevented by preventing the moth from accessing the plant - hoops of floating row cover are commonly deployed over cabbage-family plants (such as broccoli and kale) to provide this protection. Once they are present, the most common "generally considered environmentally safe" ...


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I received an email from BASF who manufacture nemaslug. It is inline with kevinsky's answer but specifically addresses slow release fertiliser so I thought I would share it. A slow release fertiliser should not affect Nemaslug. It is advisable to wait at least one month after the application of a non-slow release fertiliser, as a high concentration of ...


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Have you tried sprinkling Bt (Baccillus thuringiensis) powder on the leaves? When the larva ingest the Bt on the leaves, they die in about 3-4 days. Unfortunately I've found Bt kills most insects, and by my experience, all small aquatic invertebrates (daphnia, ostracods, etc).


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Tent caterpillars. They are usually bad because they have huge appetites as this is their growth stage, so they can strip all or most of the leaves off a tree. We used to light a firecracker in their tent and blow it up. You might want to treat with Bt, Baccillus thurengiensis powder on the leaves. They have to eat Bt for it to be effective.


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From this site Because of its high nitrogen content, fertilizer can reduce nematode effectiveness. Manufacturers recommend that fertilizers not be used two weeks prior to and after nematode application. Again, check the package instructions. That being said your mileage may vary depending on soil type, soil temperature and type of fertilizer. A ...



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