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Habitat for Humanity often runs recycling stores where you might find anything! As long as aesthetics are not a priority some of the items I have seen there that could be repurposed include: marble counter tops for the back of the enclosure plastic pipe, two inch diameter or larger can be pounded into the ground as posts chicken wire or metal grid from ...


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You can get some welded wire or chicken wire fencing and form it into a hoop house by anchoring the edges into the soil. You can also make hoops from 1/2" PVC pipe and cover it with either wire or plastic fencing, bird netting etc. That way the plants are protected from the sides and top. Although the most budget friendly thing to do is nothing if you're ...


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Somewhere between 3 and a great many T posts, and some wire fencing are generally the cheapest approach to separating plants and animals. Aesthetics tend to raise the price if you don't like the look of those. A garden supply or farm supply is more likely to have what you need than home improvement stores, which are often poor on fencing options, though they ...


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There is a human solution to this problem that will also nurture your lawn. Buy a box of Blood Meal at Home Depot or a garden center. Here is a description of it: "Blood meal is a high nitrogen fertilizer (it rates a 12-2-0; a very high number for a natural product), as are fish meal (and fish emulsion), horse and poultry manure and corn gluten meal ...


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I found that using Johnson's baby shampoo and water worked well. I used a 64oz spray bottle, about one tablespoon of shampoo and the rest water. It kills the ants and the aphids; I washed it off a few hours later, but found it really didn't make difference -- the next day I found no more ants or aphids anywhere. I also had a problem with garden snails: I ...


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This is most likely to be a scale insect but we can do a little diagnosis tree: do they fly if disturbed? => aphids or thrip do they look like they are surrounded by a cottony tuft? => mealybug are they hard shelled and need to be removed with your finger nail or a toothbrush? => scale There are many different types of scales but the ones in your ...


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DE harms insects because it gets between pieces of their carapace and cuts them up and dries them out. Worms are not insects and although a pile of dry DE might be rather excruciating to them, it won't harm them in the soil.


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I'd add that the diatomaceous earth must be food grade for use in areas where there are worms - I couldn't find out why, except that pool grade diatomaceous earth will kill them.


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It appears that earthworms will not be harmed by it. "Diatomaceous Earth will not harm warm-blooded animals or earthworms Earthworm farmers use it to treat their worm beds for parasites, fungus gnat larva etc. Earth worms are structurally different from insects in that they can actually digest particles of DE. The particles are then eliminated in their ...



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