New answers tagged

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Have you tried sprinkling Bt (Baccillus thuringiensis) powder on the leaves? When the larva ingest the Bt on the leaves, they die in about 3-4 days. Unfortunately I've found Bt kills most insects, and by my experience, all small aquatic invertebrates (daphnia, ostracods, etc).


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Tent caterpillars. They are usually bad because they have huge appetites as this is their growth stage, so they can strip all or most of the leaves off a tree. We used to light a firecracker in their tent and blow it up. You might want to treat with Bt, Baccillus thurengiensis powder on the leaves. They have to eat Bt for it to be effective.


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From this site Because of its high nitrogen content, fertilizer can reduce nematode effectiveness. Manufacturers recommend that fertilizers not be used two weeks prior to and after nematode application. Again, check the package instructions. That being said your mileage may vary depending on soil type, soil temperature and type of fertilizer. A ...


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Eastern Tent caterpillar I'd say - if they're a major problem on your tree/s every year, treatment might be necessary, otherwise, not too big a deal, easier to remove the egg masses when they're on the twigs really. They're laid in clusters on the twigs and overwinter there, so removing them in fall or in winter will solve the problem for next year - more ...


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Those look like tent caterpillars to me. Not sure of which specifically, but they are all pests. They are harmful. I don't have any good advice regarding removal; I can only tell you how not to do it: my dad got rid of them by dousing the tent in gasoline one night (when all the little buggars are in there) and lighting it (and the tree, and the tree next ...


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The moles are there because their food is there: mostly likely grubs. Put down grub killer per directions. Plug all holes but one and light a large smoke bomb (farmer sized, at farm stores, sold for gophers), and put it in the final hole. Close up the hole and wait. It should kill them.


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I buy cheap cinnamon from the dollar store and sprinkle it around. I have to redo it after every rain. It really does work.


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Its the behavior of the cats you want to change. Its pretty hard to stop them pooping everywhere without trying to stop them coming in. So if you like have cats in your garden you'll have to put up with it. When we moved house we got loads of cat poo, in a largeish city garden. Using scent markers - tiger urine etc - requires to much and has to be ...


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Get a spray bottle and spray straight ammonia in the entry holes. The next day you will see the dead rodents on your lawn.


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Trap crops may be effective at keeping the grasshoppers away from your usual plants. I've heard that trap crops can be effective for grasshoppers. Lubbers sound even more voracious than regular grasshoppers, though. So, I don't know how effective this will be. I'm not sure about Lubbers, but grasshoppers in our area seem to prefer amaranth (the weed version ...


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I use NEEM for such problems = sucking insects, though whitefly is the only one with which I specifically have had trouble on my azaleas. My understanding is that NEEM won't affect bees or other pollinating insects (unless sprayed directly on them). Not liking to get up early, I usually spray late in the day and I try to avoid spraying when the azalea is ...


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Well, I wouldn't be using any of those, particularly not imidaproclid, and I don't keep bees - that substance has been or is about to be withdrawn in the EU for two to five years to see if it impacts on the bee population, because there is such conviction of its environmental impact on bees generally, never mind whether its sprayed on open flowers or a plant ...


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I regularly bring home whiteflies on organic farm stand greens. I used to wash those greens in the kitchen sink, and the aphids would fly up to the potted herbs in my kitchen window, and so my problems began. Eventually I discovered that if I place my affected herbs in a breezy window for a while, and gently shake the plant every once in a while, the ...


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Always a tough prospect. Two things you can try: Natural deterents. Moles and gophers, do not like castor oil. There are several over the counter mole and gopher deterents, but almost all are some variation of castor oil and maybe some garlic and such. Spray/sprinkle some around active areas, and in particular around plants they would eat. The oil disrupts ...


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I seem to have fewer aphids on my runner beans when I plant marigolds nearby. I try to plant the marigolds at the same time as the beans. Planting marigolds after aphids appear does not get rid of them, in my experience. I have not taken any 'scientific' measurements, this is just a subjective observation. In about 30 years of growing beans, the 4 ...


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Marigolds will keep some animals away - works best on insects. Some people say marigolds will keep cats out of a bed, but I have had some feral cats that hadn't read this and they went in the beds and did their thing where the marigolds were. Marigolds will keep nematodes away from the members of the Solanacea family - tomatoes, peppers, petunias, tobacco, ...


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Spider mites attack just about everything, it seems. You can control them with soapy water with some vegetable oil in it. Be sure to use soap, not detergent. I buy Kirk's Castile soap & shave a bit into the water I plan to drench the plant in. You mix it well, of course - for small amounts (1 gallon or less, e.g.) I mix with a standard kitchen mixer ...


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Many people plant marigolds (Calendula officinalis, not the French marigold, Tagetes) as a 'trap' crop, but the 'trap' attracts aphids, particularly blackfly. The theory is, if the blackfly inhabit the marigolds, they won't inhabit your roses or whatever it is you're trying to protect. In my experience, blackfly do love marigolds - not quite as much as they ...


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I haven't done specific research, but am happy to provide you with my personal experience. Every year I grow many varieties of marigolds and they're always among the least bothered in my garden. Animals who eat annuals and perennials planted alongside my marigolds completely ignore them. The same holds true for chipmunks, raccoons, squirrels, and other ...


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Oh cute...Marigold plants are said to help keep predators/insects away but I've never seen anything that would verify this...grow marigolds for their beauty...they are STINKY so maybe that helps. Grins, I've never seen that marigolds helps with; cutworms, aphids, slugs, earwigs, powdery mildew, or any regular problem for other ornamentals. Vigilance, going ...



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