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2

You should track which pots are used with which, and practice crop rotation in your pots. People recommend normally a 3 year cycle, and some even leave fallow for one year for the soil to recover. The point of all this is to not allow pests, and diseases for a plant to persist in the soil, over wintering to re-emerge for the next year. It sounds somewhat ...


0

There are many web sites that make wide ranging statements about plants that repeal mosquitoes. I cannot find any academic research that supports this. I can find university sites that say that there is no plant that acts as a mosquito repellant by just being there. Any essential oils in the plant leaves must distributed in the air or applied to skin ...


4

If you can manage to get a few marigolds, plant those. They thrive on a lot of sunshine, can be grown in pots, and are good at repelling mosquitoes and most other insect pests. The beautiful flowers are a bonus.


5

I'm assuming by terrace you mean outdoors and not in - the tag of houseplant makes me ask. On the assumption you mean plants suitable for pots outdoors, lemon scented plants such as Citronella and Lemon Balm are good. Plants offered for sale under the name citronella vary - the one to look for is Cymbopogon nardus, or Citronella winterianus. Cymbopogon does ...


3

I read that in Malta it is frequent to use basil to repel mosquitos. It likes sun, but it should to be watered often to maintain the green leaves and smell. (Note: it is resilient also to dry periods).


1

This works for me. You can put little plastic containers of cinnamon where the cats go. They don't like the smell. Make sure the containers are small and have tiny holes so the odor escapes. Change the cinnamon after 2-3 rains. Containers should minimize spillage. You can also take potted plants, sprinkle the dirt in them with cinnamon, and place those ...


4

The most effective method is a sprinkler linked to a movement detector which turns on when it detects movement in the area, and stops when movement ceases. There are several available at various prices (Amazon has a range) and they're sold as motion detector sprinklers. Link below is to Amazon in the UK https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=...


3

If you see webbing, but no insects, it's likely spider mites, and you need a hand lens or very good vision. Check all the "threads " on spider mites here.


1

There isn't a permanent answer I'm afraid, other than removing the Mugo pine and planting something the sawfly isn't interested in, which in the end, might be the best solution. You can use horticultural oils such as neem instead of pesticides, and other ways of managing the pest are described in the link below - but in the end, that's all you're doing, '...


3

Most likely horse chestnut scale, common on large and small Acer varieties in the UK, as well as lime and horse chestnut trees. Although it's unsightly, on large trees it's impractical to treat, and won't kill the tree anyway. On smaller trees, you can use disposable cloths moistened with a little methylated spirits to rub over the affected woody parts, ...


3

Where I am the cabbage moth was active the whole summer until mid autumn. In fact people said it was such a good summer that we had several generations of cabbage moths this year. I tried row covers over hoops but found the following issues. I couldn't easily inspect the plants so missed seeing insect damage Moths still managed to get in possibly because ...


0

I'm far from expert on the subject, but covering when you set them out is advisable; the white cabbage moths are active in cooler weather, and I'm certain I saw the little beasts the very day transplanted my first cabbages out (into wall-o-waters once I refreshed my information enough to realize that they only take freezing well when mature, not as seedlings....


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I would ignore the spots. I find them regularly, but they doesn't expand, and it seems not to damage the plants or reduce harvest. Just check them regularly, and if they take only a small fraction of surface (other all leaves)) just ignore. On new plants (so with less leaves) I would worry some more, but I have no solution than planting more beans and ...



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