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10

What kind of succulent? If it's like most succulents, you can absolutely just trim the ends off the plant and it will be fine (and, if you wanted, you could plant those and make new plants to keep or give away). Additionally, many plants will cooperate well with root pruning, like what bonsai growers do. This typically involves taking the plant out of the ...


10

There are a variety of different jade trees; this includes some with naturally thicker trunks and others which grow thin like vines. So you may be battling against the way the plant grows naturally. Essentially, you may the wrong variety of jade tree for what you are aiming to achieve. If this is the case, I suggest you begin by looking around and ...


9

This is the jade plant or Crassula ovata. The one in the picture you have has been grown in low light and has stretched out and dropped the older leaves which is why it looks so thin. The leaves are plump and there are some yellow leaves so it does look to have been slightly over watered. The wikipedia entry noted above agrees with my experience with them ...


7

Prune it hard. Crassula Ovata can make a very attractive bonsai. If you keep cutting back the leaves it will put growth into the roots and stem. If you search for crassula ovata bonsai on google image search you will seem stunning bonsais with massive trunks like this http://www.flickr.com/photos/anafont/3409308362/. One bit advice though - move it to ...


7

I don't know which cacti they are, but I just use gardening gloves. Yes sticking-out spines will go through them. The spines on a small barrel cactus or mammary cactus where they are wrapped around more, are less likely to go through gloves. Usually I'm working with opuntia (see this question for photos), where the spines stick out more, but there are ...


6

If they were my Jade plants I would do something like the following... Based on bottom photo: Remove the lower right limb (bottom centre of photo, going towards the right) -- it looks like it has lost (had stripped away) quite a lot of bark and one of the end spurs (forks) is almost broken clean-through. Remove any branches, twigs that have been snapped ...


5

I would leave the leaves on the plant, as doing so won't have a detrimental effect on the health of the plant (as far as I'm aware), the plant just won't look that good: Best case - The leaves might recover. Worst case - The leaves don't recover, curl up (die) and fall-off, or can be picked off easily. Obviously, I wouldn't again expose the plant to that ...


3

It's probably Kleinia petraea, the trailing jade plant, and not Crassula ovata, the upright jade plant. Care regime is the same, really, but its best planted in a hanging pot rather than a standing pot. I'd repot into a hanging pot which is just big enough to take the rootball it currently has - these don't need repotting very often.


2

A plant tends to put on more top growth when it is pot bound. So, don't re pot it for at least five years. You can pinch out the top leaf set and it may branch out. Another way to make it look bushier is to detach a leaf from the stem, let it dry for a week and then put it in the soil. It will grow roots and start a new stem. Fresh soil and lower light ...


2

I'm a year late, but I'll answer, anyways, in case someone else finds this page. That's not Crassula ovata; it's Portulacaria afra - you can see the difference in the shape of the leaves. Common names include Dwarf Jade, Elephant's Food, and spekboom (in Afrikaans). This is probably the easiest plant I have ever seen to cultivate from cuttings. I'm in ...


2

Jade plants do not grow quickly. You mention that is was stressed when you bought it so it could take months before new growth is seen. To propagate twist a leaf off and let it sit in the pot or on the windowsill for a few days to harden off. The leaf needs to have the wound area dry and calloused. This area is where the roots will come from. When you ...


1

Many root rots are caused by a bacteria which takes hold if poor conditions are present like water logged soil. In a small pot of seedlings which have less resources than an established plant it's likely that if one has root rot the others have It does no harm to gently separate them into different pots with a free draining soil and good light and see what ...


1

This very similar question has a great answer and this one is about encouraging a strong trunk. Most jade plants do not grow really fast and very little pruning is needed unless you are aiming for a specific look like a bonsai tree. Re potting a jade is not required for young plants if you want to see more top growth. They can grow very large in small ...


1

This is a hard question to approach, it could be many things. If it is effecting the whole plant and you've ruled out the basics: Insects attacking leaves, branches, roots A larger plant taking over all the sunlight Water pooling Something that could have contaminated the soil where it is growing It's possible that it is some sort of disease. If it is ...



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