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I apply predatory nematodes every year for these and wireworm. Do it while the soil is still slightly damp so the nematodes can work their way down into the soil. Treat both your lawns and garden area as you don't want any sort of "reservoir" that allows them to transfer back into either area. They tend to go after carrots, I can tell how effective the ...


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Milky spore will help get rid of the grubs, though it may take a little while to work.


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If you live near a hydro grow shop they will carry a product called Mighty wash. It's like 20 bucks but if you spray every 3 days for 2 weeks it will clear it up, I had the same problem. And your plant will look green and heathy again. It's worth a try.


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That picture shows what looks remarkably like a chafer grub, commonest in lawns, but also found in borders and vegetable beds, where it particularly likes root crops. Japanese beetle grubs are similar, but have, if you look closely, a sort of hairy spine - small, fine hairs that stick up, which I cannot see in the picture, so closer examination would be good ...


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Usually around this time of the year, many gardening/nursery stores carry and sell beneficial insects, such as ladybugs and praying mantises. You can even order them online. Adult ladybugs can eat up to a 1000 aphids a day and as a larvae, about half as many. Release some of them around the base of the tree after the sun goes down, so they stay put, ...


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Grubs like the one you've pictured feed on plant roots. If there are a lot of them, then yes, they are doing damage. You may just not be noticing it yet. The worst part is they will eventually pupate into adult beetles, and those will work on damaging the above-ground parts of your plants. If they are Japanese Beetles (hard to say without more info but the ...


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In my experience, the grubs will not be a problem in the veggie garden. That said, once they go through metamorphosis, they very well may damage your plants. So, when I loosen the soil in my veggie garden in the spring, I leave the grubs on the surface for the birds to get. As for your potted orange, what do you mean when you say it is totally infested? How ...


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Hmm, that's impossible I'm afraid. Anything 'organic' isn't usually systemic, and you'd need a systemic pesticide for any lasting effect, and even then, depending on the product used, the average length of time for the product to still be having an effect will be around a fortnight. As for which product to choose, rather depends on a few things, that is, ...



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