Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

Aloes, like most succulents, are very hardy and will withstand considerable neglect . I have had two Lace Aloes (A.aristata) in a low-lit, sunless room for several years, and they are thriving. The winter temperature in this room is sometimes as low as 7 degrees celsius (44.6F) and they are quite happy. Aloes like a marked difference between day and night ...


18

Many houseplants can withstand low light intensity. You can google "houseplant". Some of them can clean the air too, according to a research done by NASA. I have a copy of that research in google doc here. Here is a shortlist of houseplants: Hedera helix English ivy Chlorophytum comosum spider plant Epipiremnum aureum golden pothos Spathiphyllum ...


17

Herbs are generally very easy to grow, as long as you don't forget to water them regularly and provide a well drained environment with sunlight at least 8 hours of the day. What you should grow largely depends on your culinary tastes (and what's expensive in your area). I must stress one point though: only plant herbs that you will use regularly. The ...


14

Inspect your flowers before bringing them inside; if you see insects on them, give them a gentle shake or dislodge the critters by hand with something like a small, soft paintbrush. Another option is to cut the flowers in the early morning and let them sit in a bucket of water outside in the shade for a few hours before bringing them inside; the insects will ...


14

Peppers are self-pollinating, so in general if you see flowers, they should produce peppers. That said, if there is insufficient air flow around the plant or if it is in an enclosure, etc., it might not be releasing enough pollen into the surrounding air to fall on the stigma. You can try gently tapping the stalk of the flower or the branch that has the ...


13

Some of the guys at my office have potted aloe plants. They do reasonably well and are hard to kill. They are under flourescent lighting, just like every other office building in the US (our lights are flush with the ceiling tiles, which puts them about 6f/2m above the desks). The plants get watered weekly. Office temperature is in the 70s like every other ...


12

You can refer to this article, I think it is okay. In my opinion, you changed the water too frequently. You should only change the water if the water is dirty or bad. When you change the water, you should never throw away all the old water, but retain 1/2 of the old water because lucky bamboo plants are sensitive to water quality change. The ultimate ...


12

Indoor gardening is a bit more difficult then the regular outdoor gardening, there are several factors but in most cases it boils down to: Temperature, Humidity, Light, The air in your apartment. You didn't mention exactly where your dying plants are being placed. Do you have a fan within the apartment? Plants need air whether it is natural or even if ...


11

Benjamin, here are my recommendations based on your answers to my questions in the above comments: Get yourself some suitably sized clay pots, they should be big enough so the plants have room to grow in, have good drainage holes in the bottom (remember you can always easily drill your own or add more, if need be) & transfer the plants into them. Pots ...


11

Two of my favorites are mint and basil. I currently grow several varieties including chocolate mint and lemon basil. They grow like weeds, so make sure you plant them in an area that you don't mind if they go wild. (A planter box should work just as well)


11

Lemon balm grows nicely in shade and makes a delicious pesto or refreshing accent to beverages. Parsley fares pretty well inside, too, but needs warmer temperatures in order to thrive. Basil actually doesn't do very well in mostly shade; it grows best in full sun. For vegetables, it seems that leafy greens are easy to grow in shade (which helps prevent ...


10

She's probably looking for some fiber in her diet. There are special grasses you can get that are good for cats: maybe just grow a little pot of one of those and she'll ignore the other plants. We did that for our cat when she was an indoors cat, and that worked fine. Now, she only knocks down plants when she's being clumsy :)


10

I agree with the above answer to your question. However, the plant in question (Lucky Bamboo) is not bamboo. It is a dracaena. It is in the same family as the Corn Plant and Marginata. Due to the way that it grows and looks it is called incorrectly called bamboo. Most bamboo which is in the grass family, would not do well sitting in water.


10

Don't despair, fortunately aloes, like most succulents, root very readily. The best way forward is to (A) take a leaf cutting and (B) plant up the broken stem, as follows: A. Remove a healthy leaf from the stem (with a sharp knife) and leave it to dry out for two or three days, until a thin 'skin' forms over the open edge; Insert it firmly in some moist ...


10

These translucent worms are almost certainly the larvae of Fungus Gnats and, if you look closely, you may see the adults running across the soil. They are attracted by damp conditions and their presence suggests that you have been keeping your moss too moist. They also thrive on potting soil that is high in organic matter - and on peat moss! I have done a ...


10

For many indoor tropical plants life in the office is slow death. You may feel that way yourself after a bad day! With minimal light levels and good watering practices most tropicals will live for a while. The ones that require high light will draw on their stored resources in the roots and gradually go downhill. Tropicals that tolerate low light levels for ...


10

This is the jade plant or Crassula ovata. The one in the picture you have has been grown in low light and has stretched out and dropped the older leaves which is why it looks so thin. The leaves are plump and there are some yellow leaves so it does look to have been slightly over watered. The wikipedia entry noted above agrees with my experience with them ...


9

On a ficus plant, leaves and new branches can grow out of the side of virtually any live wood surface; even from older, "hardened" wood. New growth from the bottom is normal, particularly after any kind of shock which will cause all sorts of new growth. But if that top part is alive, you should be seeing new growth coming from the top, too. Check the tips ...


9

Herbs are generally going to be your best bet, and a windowsill of fresh herbs for cooking is a great thing, but I'm not sure if this is going to fit your need for vegetables. Vegetables would be easier if you have a little extra space to work with, such as a deck or maybe a window planter that you could attach to the outside of your sill. After that, it's ...


9

After the suggestions here regarding pollination hadn't helped I continued to research, and apparently it seems that over fertilisation can cause an excess of foliage growth and delay fruit production. I originally ignored this as a possibility - I wasn't feeding the plants - but then the plant in question (and the one next to it) continued to grow much, ...


9

The appearance of the soil surface in your photos leads me to think that over-watering may be the cause of the mold/fungus; a constantly wet growing medium provides ideal conditions for mold to develop. The soil needs to dry out a little between waterings, so that it is only slightly damp to the touch, and never wet. The slight browning of the stems where ...


8

Although I have no experience of this particular variety, I suspect that the main reason why its leaves are yellowing is that it is receiving too much direct light. These plants prefer indirect light. They are fairly tolerant of low-light conditions and the room in which it lives looks light enough for its needs; the light tube is probably doing more harm ...


8

The only disadvantages that occur to me are: (1) they require regular attention (feeding and watering), (2) need someone to take care of them when you are away on holiday, (3) outgrow their pots, become root-bound and need to be potted on, and (4) sometimes flourish so well that they eventually require a pot that is too large for the situation in which they ...


8

You are dealing with a very sensitive plant. Aloe's require a lot of sun and love hot weather. Unless you are working outdoors in the sun you will not see this plant flourish. I have never tried growing one indoors but what you can try is to use some cactus soil mix with very good drainage. If you are planting a new one do not bury it too deep, the plant ...


8

The three numbers should represent N-P-K: N for Nitrogen - helps produce more chlorophyll – makes the leaves/lawn look greener P for Phosphorus - promotes root development K for Potassium - helps with winterizing, and drought resistance. Have fun gardening!


7

Given that your avocado was doing well before you moved it into a warm, centrally-heated environment, the problem is likely to be caused by: a constantly dry atmosphere The best way to give it more humidity, is to stand it on a 'pebble tray' - fill a shallow plastic tray (one which is two or three times as wide as the base of your pot) with pebbles or ...


7

You can grow non-fruiting vegetables, like lettuce and spinach, indoors under florescent bulb. Use 6500K bulbs. You need 30 watts per square foot. Place the bulbs so close to the plants that they nearly touch. Raise the light as the plant grows.


7

The fact that your rubber plant has survived so long in a non-draining pot is a credit to your watering skills; in my experience, very few indoor plants will tolerate a non-draining environment very long, however careful one is to avoid over-watering. In addition to causing root-rot as you pointed out, standing water at the bottom of the pot will sooner or ...


7

First, you must be doing pretty much everything right if you have been growing this plant for "several years" :) Second, I'm guessing that what you have is "Lucky Bamboo", if I have that correct, try the following: Before transplanting into a larger pot, I would take a cutting or two from the plant (if it's viable, I can't tell from the photo as it ...


7

Summary (or, "But I didn't sign up for the organic chemistry lecture!"): The numbers are the amounts of major plant nutrients. Get a "balanced" (numbers that are close to each other) fertilizer, preferably "with micronutrients". Read the label. Mix and apply as directed. Liquid Growth Indoor Plant 4-12-9 Food; All Purpose Liquid Concentrate ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible