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4

Kind of hard to tell from the photo, but the constellation of them makes me think aphids. Aphids reproduce very quickly, by live birth and eggs, and are very difficult to eliminate, but pretty manageable... I don't know where you live and what you local fauna is like, but ladybugs are the natural predator of the aphid, these can be purchased commercially ...


4

This article is extremely detailed so I will give the salient points: if the main stem dies it is likely to sprout multiple stems, give it a few months not fussy as to soil guavas are tough, verging on weedy in the tropics. Don't give up hope! regular watering when the top half inch of soil dries out should do does not tolerate frost and not happy with ...


3

You want to cull after fruit set for the reason you mentioned, pollination, and also because some of the fruits in a cluster will not be quite as strong as others. You won't be able to tell which flowers will set, and which ones are the highest quality, until after pollination. Most Guava varieties are self pollinating, but you may get a bigger harvest ...


3

They're fruit flies not aphids. I have the same problem with my guava tree. Use a safe pesticide often.


2

I agree with Grady Player - almost certainly aphids. To help control the aphids, as well as soapy water, various oraganic spray and pesticides, some people recommend knocking them off with streams of water from a hose, or brush them off and/or squashing them by hand if there aren't too many. Re: the ladybirds - I don't think you can force the ladybirds ...


2

As far as I'm aware, this is detrimental to each tree and you should cut off 2 of them to focus the available light, moisture, and nutrients to the one tree. The trees may be sprouts from a larger single tree that was cut down for some reason or they may be sprouts from guava seeds that were dropped there naturally by birds or as part of a compost heap or ...


2

Okay, you say it was in a smaller pot and the roots hadn't filled that pot. I'm afraid putting it in a much larger pot was the worst thing you could have done if you wanted to keep the tree small. If the rootball that was present originally hadn't completely filled the pot, it would have been best to leave it in that pot until it actually needed repotting, ...


1

I believe guava can be grown as a multi-stemmed tree, and this is probably what you have. I'm not familiar with growing guava outside, but other fruit trees are sometimes planted close together to a) provide pollinators without taking up a lot of space and b) to stunt the growth of the trees, so they stay a reasonable size. It is also possible that this is ...



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