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20

I live in Vegas and have grown lettuce, spinach, and carrots and am now working on growing cucumbers and zucchini. (I'll let you know in about 6 more weeks how that turned out.) I use a "raised" bed (actually, I dug about a foot down [boy, was that caliche fun] then used top soil and compost from Star Nursery instead of the horrible soil we have here) and ...


16

That is Pokeweed.


12

I think you are going to have trouble without irrigation. In North Texas (more humid and probably slightly more temperate, but 100+ temps are common in summer and frosts in winter), we have mixed results with root vegetables. Their main problem is that they need a lot of water and you need to crop early. Corn and beans have grown okay although I found corn ...


11

Lemon balm grows nicely in shade and makes a delicious pesto or refreshing accent to beverages. Parsley fares pretty well inside, too, but needs warmer temperatures in order to thrive. Basil actually doesn't do very well in mostly shade; it grows best in full sun. For vegetables, it seems that leafy greens are easy to grow in shade (which helps prevent ...


11

That is Mock Strawberry, Duchesnea indica. The fruits are edible, but rather tasteless. This is a common weed in much of the United States. Look for small, strawberry-like plants in your lawn, with long stolons connecting the individual crowns. These plants have five petaled yellow flowers. See comparison photos:


11

A picture would be nice. If the trees are young, they may not yet have an extensive enough root system and canopy to support all the fruit so you end up with lots of small fruit rather then larger specimens. And do you want growth wasted when they drop prematurely as the tree sheds those it can't support? Another reason is that low lying branches laden with ...


10

It's all genetic. Here is a list of the taxonomies of several common curcurbits: Watermelon: Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Violales Family: Curcurbitaceae Genus: Citrullus Species: lanatus Squash: Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Magnoliophyta Class:: Magnoliopsida Order: Violales Family: Curcurbitaceae Genus: Curcurbita ...


10

This is the Concord grape, which due to some diligent and patient planting and tasting of wild born vitis riperia vines one was discovered that tastes good for tables and juice and was named Concord. This is also the grape that was first used to make "grape flavor" but I think it is now synthesized.


10

Depending on where you live there could be a compatible cherry near enough that you will get fruit. Fortunately there are good resources out there to find good pollinators for stone fruit. Typically the male part of the flower will become active at a different part of time than the female part, to help eliminate self pollination, so variety X may be suitable ...


10

We get 30 litres of coffee grounds once a month from the local deli. We're on a list of people who take the stuff to stop it going into landfill. It just goes straight into our compost pile. Newly cooked grounds are sterile enough so can be used for growing some mushrooms, and they don't then get competition from other fungi. Some people use coffee ...


9

If you want all of the plants to be the same type, you would probably want a row of shrubs that grow between 3 and 6 feet tall and don't spread much. Blueberries would do well in your location, if you have an acid soil high in humus. Thornless blackberries would produce lots of fruit, but take a lot of care in pruning and supporting. Grapes need more ...


9

A healthy strawberry runner is considered to be a "new" plant. Many of the long-term strawberry beds I've read about use runners as a way of renewing the beds every year or every other year, and as a result, the bed itself produces for quite a long time. To maintain the quality and productivity of the berry patch, the planting must be renovated each ...


8

A quote from Golden Gate Gardener on the identification This happens because some mites enter the flower buds and start sucking out the sap. The ovary of the flower is misshapen, so the fruit is, well, outlandish. Citrus bud mite is apparently particularly a problem near the coast in our area, just where we depend on lemons for most of our garden citrus. ...


8

Highbush blueberries: They're a reasonable size Make an attractive hedge Attractive fall foliage Blueberries are delicious!


8

That is Passiflora suberosa, or corky stem passionflower. The fruits are edible when ripe. They can contain small amounts of cyanide when green. Note that this is an invasive weed in some areas. References: 1. (cabi.org) http://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/38805 2. (toptropicals.com) http://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/Passiflora_suberosa.htm 3. (...


8

I believe that what you're describing is a type of citrus medica commonly known under many names such as Citron, Etrog, Esrog, Turanj, Bara Nimbu, e.t.c. and I'd guess they also come in all kinds of shapes and sizes. I've seen really odd octopus-like looking fingered etrog ones with their bottom half split into many arms or fingers, but most would look like ...


8

As long as you are willing to water there are many options. Fruit trees that will work: low chill, early ripening apples, peaches, plums, figs, pomegranates, nectarines and apricots and virtually all varieties of citrus trees. Grapes can also be grown, as well as melons and strawberries. I have seen various bare root berries available (my two attempts at ...


8

What "full size" IS depends on what you do or don't do (and/or what "June-drop" does or not do for you.) More smaller fruit - don't thin. Less larger fruit - do thin. From the tree's point of view the smallest, seediest fruit that will still be considered edible by some animal who will transport the seeds elsewhere is "big enough." If you thin the fruit, ...


8

As well as the issue of small-sized fruit, another consequence of letting a tree over-crop by not thinning is that the tree may start a cycle of only producing a good crop once every two years. This problem affects apples and pears more than other tree fruits. Some varieties are more prone to "biennial bearing" than others, but curing it is difficult - ...


7

Having been in a commercial apple "cold store", I would think coolness was the most important. The lights were on when I was there, but I assume they went off when the door closed. Can't comment on air circulation, or what kind of humidity control existed (this was in England). However, I think windfalls are probably a major reason for your problem. ...


7

Tomato fruit splitting, assuming it occurs as the fruits are growing/ripening, is caused by uneven or irregular water supply, or wildly fluctuating temperatures. If they're in a heated greenhouse, check that the temperature remains fairly even night and day - a temperature drop at night is fine, but not if it's dropping by a lot. Equally, if the greenhouse ...


7

It's a water problem, specifically, not enough, evidenced by the browning edges on the leaves and the shrivelled fruits. Once the berries start forming, you need to keep the plant well supplied with water, or the fruit will atrophy on the stem. You say you bought the plant earlier this year, so the fact it's only been planted this year also means it has a ...


7

Osage orange Maclura pomifera, a.k.a hedge-apple. a.k.a. Bois d'arc and further mangled to bodark. The latter set of names have to do with the wood's suitability for archery bows.


7

None of those are particularly "fast" examples. Radish is fast - 3 weeks to harvest for the small types. I don't like it much, but it's fast. You'd need to let some go to seed for seeds. Since your "not actually very fast" examples seem to mostly be things that are usually propagated by clone, potatoes, sweet potatoes/yams, shallots, sunchokes, ...


7

Think of how tomatoes grow "in the wild" fruit drops to the ground, slowly rots, and when conditions are right a new plant emerges. So cut open the fruit and cover it in soil, the results are not surprising. I don't see why this method wouldn't work for people who just want a "tomato". The types of people that will save seeds from store bought tomatoes and ...


6

Oregon's Agricultural Extension Service has the best Extension Service web site I've ever seen! When you look in seed catalogs, you'll see they give a number of days from planting to harvest for each variety.


6

Local newspapers and master gardener groups are a place to look - they may have websites of pamphlets/booklets. Here's one for Eugene (see note below): http://www.eugeneweekly.com/springplantingguide/index.html Also your local agricultural university (not sure if that will be U.Oregon, or if you have an "A&M" as it were) will usually have very ...


6

I'd think blueberries, too - except for the driveway location. You neighbor may not thank you for all the blue bird-poop. If you are willing to put netting over them, if you need to, then I agree that they're the best fit otherwise. You might consider golden raspberries. The canes are nowhere near as nice to look at as blueberry bushes, but the berries ...


6

An article at slate.com describes how food labs measure calories, and where the calorie numbers come from on food labels. It's good for background info on the process. Unless you have a remarkably well-stocked and well-equipped lab in your basement, you're not going to be able to test vitamin content at home. As far as I can tell, literature dealing with ...



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