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14

I live in Vegas and have grown lettuce, spinach, and carrots and am now working on growing cucumbers and zucchini. (I'll let you know in about 6 more weeks how that turned out.) I use a "raised" bed (actually, I dug about a foot down [boy, was that caliche fun] then used top soil and compost from Star Nursery instead of the horrible soil we have here) and ...


11

Lemon balm grows nicely in shade and makes a delicious pesto or refreshing accent to beverages. Parsley fares pretty well inside, too, but needs warmer temperatures in order to thrive. Basil actually doesn't do very well in mostly shade; it grows best in full sun. For vegetables, it seems that leafy greens are easy to grow in shade (which helps prevent ...


10

I think you are going to have trouble without irrigation. In North Texas (more humid and probably slightly more temperate, but 100+ temps are common in summer and frosts in winter), we have mixed results with root vegetables. Their main problem is that they need a lot of water and you need to crop early. Corn and beans have grown okay although I found corn ...


8

Here is a list of the taxonomies of several common curcurbits: Watermelon: Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Violales Family: Curcurbitaceae Genus: Citrullus Species: lanatus Squash: Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Magnoliophyta Class:: Magnoliophyta Order: Violales Family: Curcurbitaceae Genus: Curcurbita Species: Pumpkin: ...


7

Having been in a commercial apple "cold store", I would think coolness was the most important. The lights were on when I was there, but I assume they went off when the door closed. Can't comment on air circulation, or what kind of humidity control existed (this was in England). However, I think windfalls are probably a major reason for your problem. ...


7

Tomato fruit splitting, assuming it occurs as the fruits are growing/ripening, is caused by uneven or irregular water supply, or wildly fluctuating temperatures. If they're in a heated greenhouse, check that the temperature remains fairly even night and day - a temperature drop at night is fine, but not if it's dropping by a lot. Equally, if the greenhouse ...


6

If you want all of the plants to be the same type, you would probably want a row of shrubs that grow between 3 and 6 feet tall and don't spread much. Blueberries would do well in your location, if you have an acid soil high in humus. Thornless blackberries would produce lots of fruit, but take a lot of care in pruning and supporting. Grapes need more ...


6

A healthy strawberry runner is considered to be a "new" plant. Many of the long-term strawberry beds I've read about use runners as a way of renewing the beds every year or every other year, and as a result, the bed itself produces for quite a long time. To maintain the quality and productivity of the berry patch, the planting must be renovated each ...


5

Oregon's Agricultural Extension Service has the best Extension Service web site I've ever seen! When you look in seed catalogs, you'll see they give a number of days from planting to harvest for each variety.


5

Local newspapers and master gardener groups are a place to look - they may have websites of pamphlets/booklets. Here's one for Eugene (see note below): http://www.eugeneweekly.com/springplantingguide/index.html Also your local agricultural university (not sure if that will be U.Oregon, or if you have an "A&M" as it were) will usually have very ...


5

An article at slate.com describes how food labs measure calories, and where the calorie numbers come from on food labels. It's good for background info on the process. Unless you have a remarkably well-stocked and well-equipped lab in your basement, you're not going to be able to test vitamin content at home. As far as I can tell, literature dealing with ...


5

Suggestions: Mint Ginger, cardamom or other Zingiberales Chives or other Allia (assuming enough morning sun) Cranberries, lingonberries or other Vaccinia See also Five Overlooked Edible Plants for Your Garden which suggests Wintergreen and edible ferns as commonly overlooked shade-loving edibles.


5

A quote from Golden Gate Gardener on the identification This happens because some mites enter the flower buds and start sucking out the sap. The ovary of the flower is misshapen, so the fruit is, well, outlandish. Citrus bud mite is apparently particularly a problem near the coast in our area, just where we depend on lemons for most of our garden citrus. ...


5

I'd think blueberries, too - except for the driveway location. You neighbor may not thank you for all the blue bird-poop. If you are willing to put netting over them, if you need to, then I agree that they're the best fit otherwise. You might consider golden raspberries. The canes are nowhere near as nice to look at as blueberry bushes, but the berries ...


5

I believe that what you're describing is a type of citrus medica commonly known under many names such as Citron, Etrog, Esrog, Turanj, Bara Nimbu, e.t.c. and I'd guess they also come in all kinds of shapes and sizes. I've seen really odd octopus-like looking fingered etrog ones with their bottom half split into many arms or fingers, but most would look like ...


4

My best guess is plum curculio (see Figure 2, looks like yours). "The Organic Gardener's Handbook of Natural Pest and Disease Control" (p170) suggests spreading a cloth on the ground and tapping the tree -- twice a day -- with a padded mallet. Gather up the bugs that fall and destroy. Or pasture your chickens in the orchard... Or they suggest spraying ...


4

Keep them cool and damp: 32F with 90% humidity is ideal. Every bit above 32 and below 90 will take a little bit off the "ideal conditions" storage life. Don't store windfalls. Put them in a bowl on the table and eat them "soon". If you lose everything in the fruit bowl, it's not such a big loss. If you lose everything in your winter store, that's much ...


4

The links in the other answers are great starting points, but experience will be your best teacher. The best advice I've read is to keep a gardening notebook. At a minimum, write down when you plant, the problems you encounter, and when you harvest. (You can also write down how much you harvest, which is helpful for figuring out how much you should plant ...


4

According to Peggy A. Mauk, Ph.D. and Tom Shea: This is frequently referred to as “June drop”. Young fruit (smaller than 1 inch in diameter) may drop in May, June and/or July. Some fruit drop is natural. Excessive drop may be due to drought stress, sudden high temperatures, low humidity, or nitrogen deficiency. Heavy pruning, thrips, mites, or spray ...


3

I am attempting to answer this because someone better qualified has not... I don't have much experience of the north hemisphere growing season but I do know that in the Adelaide Hills near where I live (roughly Meditteranean but cooler at this higher altitude) huge crops of strawberries are produced from now until the end of April which corresponds to ...


3

Beware, that does not appear to be Passiflora subpeltata because the fruit are the wrong color. It is a Passiflora, though its dangerous to eat the fruit if it is an unknown variety. Those fruit are way too small to eat anyways since its the pulp inside that is eaten and those would have scant pulp.


3

It also depends on what type of apple you are storing. Certain types of apples last much longer than other varieties. Fugi and Granny Smith for example are well know for their long shelf life. Commercially apples are stored in highly-ventilated, carbon dioxide rich chambers and are waxed to prolong shelf life. Perhaps in addition to the other ...


3

We may have a similar climate at least in summer, I am in a mediterranean climate. Heat started early with two weeks of 40+C (104F) followed by high 30s. No rain until autumn if we are luckly. I restrict the vegi patch to a very small area in summer which I can water. A few tomatoe plants which are started early so they are large and fruiting before the ...


2

Have you checked the pH of the soil AND water? Should be just right at 7... Are you using a citrus fertilizer? Should be using a fertilizer for citrus... Have you checked closely for pests? Some pests will feed on roots and you won't see them... Are you sure you're not OVER watering or feeding? That's a quick way to kill a plant slowly... Is the soil ...


2

The following (plus a lot more) is available via Oregon State University Extension Service: Monthly Garden Calendars Growing your own Direct link to PDF - Growing your own (full publication) Direct link to PDF preview - Sustainable Gardening Handbook - could well be worth the $30 cover price for this 531 publication Gardening Tips How-Tos and ...


2

Fedco Trees lists a couple of varieties in their catalog that might meet your requirements. See page 42 of the 2012 catalog: R. ‘Fru Dagmar Hastrup’: Relatively low-growing form with rich green, deeply veined disease-resistant foliage that turns bronze in fall. Very large red hips. Recommended for the edible landscape. Z4 R. rugosa ‘Scabrosa’: ...


2

I have worked in and studied various greenhouses with a wide variety of tropical plants. As glass blocks most ultraviolet rays these plants would not have been receiving the same amount as they would in their normal environment. Most plants will flower and fruit in a greenhouse if conditions are right. Some of the factors that are of greater importance ...


2

Are you certain they are all the same type of strawberry? My strawberry bed has a mix of June bearing and Everbearing plants - the June bearers flower once in the spring, the everbearers flower at about the same time in the spring, and are flowering again right now. If you have a mix, it could be that the plants which are not flowering are your June bearers. ...


2

It looks like incomplete pollination to me. Early spring with its irregular cold snaps can sometimes interfere with pollination, even for plants that are self-fertile. There may be enough seed set to trigger fruit formation, but not enough to warrant the plant putting energy into making a full-size fruit for just a few seeds.


2

The answer might be that the sunlight is weaker, as you put it. Although Passiflora likes sun, even in the UK the advice is to protect or shade from very hot sun from late spring to early summer, which implies this plant grows better when the sun is less strong. Certainly, sunlight in the UK during April, May and early June is stronger in terms of UV than ...



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