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I am cutting my lower leaves frequently this year, as I train the tomato plants up a trellis. I have two of each type of tomato planted together, and will limit each plant to 2 or 3 good stems off the main trunk. I think of it as Bonsai tomato growing.


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Rose new growth is reddish from anthrocyanin pigments which protect the cellular growth from sunlight UV. It fades as the foliage matures. The new growth must be healthy without leaf distortion and the red pigment will fade out as the leaves mature. The upper picture looks normal to me. The bottom one, I will leave to someone a little more experienced with ...


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You might be able to use a barrier to keep leafhoppers that carry the disease off the plants. I always cover my tomato plants with shade screen to keep the birds and pests off, and to provide shade during our very hot, sunny summer days. If heavy shade is not desirable then maybe garden fabric (floating row cover) would work for you. This site has some good ...


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It's not necessary, if you're mulching. I don't do it in any case, but it can help prevent blight when the plants are over bare soil. The cuts shouldn't really cause disease either - they'll dry off fast. It's just unnecessary to clip 'em off, over a grass clipping mulch. .


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This is something called fasciation, caused by abnormal growth activity - as to what triggers that, there are 4 possible causes:- bacterial infection, viral infection, random genetic mutation, or injury through cold, mechanical damage or other damage. Those brown things might be adult scale - check the backs of other leaves, looking for white flecks - a ...


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One thing you haven't said is whether these are early cropping or not, I'm assuming they're supposed to be. Its not really clear what's happening there - I'd say the tiny holes could be flea beetle damage, and the brown areas might be viral - the link below might be of interest, though its somewhat complicated because there are so many possible viruses out ...


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This is most likely to be a cottony mealybug. You can control this taking a paper towel soaked in dish soap and water and wiping the leaves down. Repeat for every leaf with the symptoms. Check the axils where the leaves join the stems too. After the treatment rinse or spray with water to prevent a soapy buildup repeat every five to seven days for at ...


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The angular edges of the lesion in the first picture are suggestive of early blight. The image quality isn't quite good enough for me to tell if the spot is made up of concentric rings, but that would also be highly suggestive of early blight. The third picture does resemble leaf curl, but it could also be that the stem has been blighted, causing the leaves ...



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