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2

Looks like some kind of fungal infection - cut the main stem back down to where that new shoot is on the right (in the picture), at an angle away from the shoot, in hopes the trouble does not spread down the plant and kill it. Leave the new ones at the bottom until you see how the plant fares once cut back.


4

I agree they're most likely flea beetles - close examination of the pics shows very small holes appearing in leaves. You can try this to control them: 2 parts rubbing alcohol, 5 parts water and 1 tablespoon of liquid soap, mixed in a sprayer, spray all leaves, including the backs, till run off. This 'recipe' is from the Old Farmers Almanac - the only thing ...


5

I believe those are flea beetles, from the family Chrysomelidae. They can be a bad pest, but I have successfully ridded them from my property, and haven't seen one here for some time. I've successfully used neem oil, but I use 2% mix, which is twice as strong as what you used. Maybe that explains why it worked so well for me. Here are some of the ideas ...


1

I think you have Cucumber mosaic virus, because of the mosaicing, curling, and drying of the leaves, and the stop in production, plus the time frame of infection matches perfectly. There is no cure. What you can do is try to keep it from spreading, which is done by removing affected plants from the environment. Burn or seal them in bags to prevent the virus ...


0

I suspect an infection - what's important is the precise nature of the yellow spots when they appear - you've said it starts on the crown of the plant, which I take to mean the oldest leaves - if the spots are pale yellow, followed by grey fuzz or felt which might cover the leaves, it's powdery mildew. Left untreated, it will cause the results you show in ...


2

Stormy, you've said you used a quarter of a cup of milk to one gallon of water - I've no idea how that works out, but the ratio of milk to water is 1 part milk to 9 parts water, at a push, 2 parts milk to 8 parts water, though there is no benefit in using a higher milk ratio. I suspect even a cup of milk doesn't work out at one part - if you're making a ...


3

That time of year and inevitable. For summer squash, you can cut the worst affected leaves off, leaving the stem. We make sure all the cucumbers grow up on frames so they're well off the ground and ventilated. Foliar spraying a baking soda solution of 1 Tsp per Quart of water can help raise the pH and hold it off. Potassium bicarbonate will actually be ...


6

Scale infestation - brown scale in fact, not that it matters. If you've got some rubbing alcohol or some methylated spirits, dip a cotton bud (Q tip) in and rub off the scale from the stems, being careful not to douse the stems or leaves in the spirit solution. The immature ones on the back of the leaves (paler, smaller) are susceptible to oil sprays such as ...


2

I just wanted to come back and add my personal experience and anecdotal evidence. Yes, it is safe to eat the fruit of plants infected with early blight. We've eaten many of the tomatoes from these plants. We simply threw away any that were squishy and undesirable (which we would have done anyway) and have eaten the rest without any ill effects what so ever. ...



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