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1

In light of your dry climate, it could be copper deficiency. Watering with a blue water soluble fertilizer should help to fix that, though, if true. Kelp is an option for extra copper (and other minerals). Too much phosphorus could have caused the copper not to be available to your plant. I see that you fertilized with 10-15-10 fertilizer, and that you said ...


1

I have the same problem. The nursery told me to put some Lime in the soil. A second gardener recommended "Lilly Miller,"Super Sweet". I have removed the peppers that have the Calcium problem and hopefully this will help.


4

I can't tell properly from the photograph, but the third photo does suggest you have your raspberry planted in what appears to be a trough. If you have, troughs aren't usually any deeper than 8 inches at most, more often 4-6 inches, and that is no way deep enough for a raspberry plant. The leaves are curling upwards rather than down, so it doesn't seem to ...


1

Incest, well, not really, is it. No, it doesn't happen, well, not real degenerative changes, in the manner that happens with humans if they breed with close relatives, and not in plants like calendula grown outdoors where they are in the open and free to reproduce as they will. Sometimes there may be slight changes - perhaps a flower arrives on, say, a ...


0

It could be in part due to natural selection, rather than degeneration from inbreeding. I know Yellow Pear tomatoes have been grown since at least 1805, and most of that has probably been from inbreeding. They're still pretty nice tomatoes. It could just be that the climate and conditions in your area favor certain traits, or the less colorful flowers ...


2

Those spots are no big deal. A fungus that is splashed up on the leaf and the plants itself is getting rid of the fungus with this 'shot hole' approach. Very normal. I think you might have over done the organic, non-decomposed manure. Too much nitrogen which promotes too much vegetative growth and will definitely reduce the reproductive growth or...flowers ...


2

Septoria leaf spot is characterized by dark brown margins and tan to gray centers. I don't see light centers in the spots on your picture. Septoria leaf spot usually appears on the lower leaves after the first fruit sets. Spots are circular, about one-sixteenth to one-fourth inch in diameter with dark brown margins and tan to gray centers with small ...


4

Looks like septoria leaf spot. The lower leaves usually get it first from the soil splashing up on the leaves, and humidity can play a big part in the spread. You should use mulch. I've had great results with organic paper mulch that I got on amazon. Make sure to trim the lower leaves once the plants are established to prevent them from touching the soil. ...


-1

Its looking like lack of minerals. You should more take care of that and keep watering properly and also use natural fertilizers.


3

In short, no. At the moment, as I'm sure you know, the only way of handling this infection is to try to prevent it in the first place. Over time, and with research, someone might come up with a way of treating infected trees, but its always harder when fungus is the problem and not bacteria. Current methods of preventing infection with blue fungus are more ...



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