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Not a nutrient deficiency, more like a drought problem, or that cane is an original one on the plant when you got it, possibly last year's or the year before's cane. The taller, bushy one is newer and younger. Otherwise, some sort of damage or problem with the stem on that one. UPDATE: Oh dear, Jojo, never mind, not much you can do now. That brown growth at ...


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I think I have it. That looks a lot like tomato yellow leaf curl virus. This can cause curling without yellowing (see matching pics). It is spread by adult silverleaf whiteflies, which makes sense in your case (enclosed). It also explains why only the tomatoes have been affected. Unfortunately there is no cure, so if the plants don't recover on their own ...


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Your plant is indeed in the beginning stage of Early Blight, Alternaria solani. It looks like your plants will pull through fine if you start treating now. The earlier you treat, the better the control, as a strong infection will build up resistance to the fungicide. Here's what to do: Remove all leaves showing sings of early blight (yellowing, dry ...


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The original poster says: It seems the yellow stuff is simply some discoloration, and does not cause any problems in itself. I have however stopped using cotton wool entirely, as is has some major drawbacks. In a DWC, it gets completely soaked all the time, and the roots within will not get any air. Even if the DWC is aerated. So for me I changed ...


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They are scale insects; spray the plant with summer oil mixed with systemic insecticide (Acitamiprid or Imidacloprid) according to the concentration mentioned in the label. Then do a repeat spraying after two weeks. It is better to add some foliar fertilizers to the solution sprayed. Note: do not use winter oil instead of summer oil. If you have not found ...


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This is definitely an Acer, but what you're seeing there is a case of Rhytisma acerinum, commonly known as Tar Spot of Acer, or Acer Leaf Spot. It's a fungal infection, and in the UK, there is no effective fungicide treatment available, though you may find there is something you can use where you are. This infection doesn't kill the tree, but it can make it ...


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That is a Red Maple, Acer rubrum. The damage resembles fungal leaf spot. They were obviously planted at near the same size they are at now. They were probably 5-7 years old at planting, and planted as a balled and burlapped tree. You can see the last year of growth from when they were at the nursery. It is about the top 1/4-1/5 of the tree. When a tree ...


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I believe this is Acer rubrum. Red Maple. There are a couple of things you should check: How deep this tree was buried. A very common contractor thing. Make sure that the bark is out of the soil and mulch. Only the roots should be buried. Your picture tells me the mulch is up too high on the bark of this tree. Pull it away, 6" or more. Moisture being ...


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I am going to put an educated guess out that this is sun damage. Why? Notice that all of the dead spots are on the tops of the most exposed branches, but not the undersides, and not the protected branches. With a fungus attack, you should expect the worst areas to be where the exposure is lowest, and the air circulation is poorest. I have seen this type of ...



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