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14

One would expect that the producers of the seed potatoes are going to be better about keeping their product disease free than your average supermarket, but there are no guarantees in life. As to your chances of getting a bad, disease carrying potato from your supermarket, I'd say that depends on how well you trust that supermarket (though I'd guess it's ...


13

I had an entire potato crop get hit by late blight (which didn't come in via the seed potatoes) a couple of years ago. Fortunately I was able to dig the potatoes and dispose of the plants before the tubers were affected -- they were fine to eat -- but I certainly didn't save any of those for planting the following year since they would be blight hosts. How ...


11

According to notes by the Alabama A&M and Auburn Universities: BER is caused by calcium deficiency, usually induced by fluctuations in the plant's water supply. Because calcium is not a highly mobile element in the plant, even brief fluctuations in the water supply can cause BER. Also, if plants are growing in highly acidic soil or are getting too ...


11

This is Fire Blight, a bacterial infection commonly spread by bees and other pollinators. Hence the infection usually starts at the blossoms. It typically extends into the branches and twigs, but is often localized. It can, however spread into the tree (especially a weakened tree). Death is inevitable if the infection reaches the roots. Pears are ...


11

I would have said Blossom End Rot because that seems to be the most rot along these lines., and especially as you have it on a few of the larger fruit. It is caused by a Calcium deficiency. Check your MiracleGro - it is probably almost all NPK but might have Calcium in smaller quantities. Is that enough? I don't know. Usually the problem occurs more due to ...


10

Sounds like Verticillium wilt. Verticillium wilt is a soil-borne fungal disease that results in the yellowing, and eventual browning and death of foliage, particularly in branches closest to the soil. The wilt starts as yellow, V-shaped areas that narrow at the leaf margins. These yellow areas grow over time, turn brown, and then the leaf dies. Often, ...


10

You probably can pinch the lower branches off, and actually help the growth of the plant. Your plant can grow pretty big (4 feet) so to encourage tall growth (and keep the leaves away from the dirt, which probably caused the yellowing) pull them out. If it goes on, pull the plant out (don't compost it) and be thankful it is early in the year. It's ...


9

These are almost certainly parasites called Scale insects which suck the juices out of the stem and leaves and cause the plant to lose vigor. In this case it is a Coccus. Fortunately, you have spotted them early, before your avocado has become infested with them, and they can easily be removed in one of the following ways: Scrape them off with a cotton ...


8

The advice not to plant brassicas on the same plot more than once every three years is not unusual; crop rotation is recommended for all vegetables, as nutritional needs and intake vary slightly from one vegetable group to another; therefore, growing the same group on the same plot year after year may deplete the soil of a particular nutrient and lead to ...


7

This could also simply be a Nitrogen deficiency. The plant will transfer Nitrogen from the lower, older leaves up to the upper, newer ones if it doesn't have enough available Nitrogen in the soil. Feeding with fish emulsion (There are a few brands, and what your local store has will probably depend on what region you're in: My local Home Depot carries ...


7

The advice to avoid putting brassica roots into compost is widespread, but not absolute. If you don't have a club root infection, you can compost the roots. This scientific study found that Plasmodiophora brassicae (the club root pathogen) was destroyed when composted in windrows at 54-73°C for 6-7 days with adequate moisture content. My compost sometimes ...


7

I'd hazard an educated guess at bad growing conditions - it looks as if this plant is in a pot, which presumably has drainage holes, sitting inside an outer container which probably does not. Succulents like to be kept on the dry side, preferring well drained conditions - if you've watered that too often, and not emptied the outer pot of all water twice ...


7

Looking closely at the last picture, there are clear dark concentric circles around the black spots which is textbook early blight. It is a trademark of the disease. Blight has been bad, really bad this year. Your best chance is unfortunately to pull the plants and save any remaining healthy plants. Then going forward there are some key cultural ...


6

Mealybugs are only one of over a thousand different varieties of Scale Insects which vary tremendously in appearance, and it is almost certainly one of these that is attacking your palms -see here and here. Scale insects, apart from mealybugs, are mostly sedentary creatures (apparently, the females are usually immobile), and they are difficult to control ...


6

The burnt/scorched looking leaves could mean a lot of things. My first guess would be over fertilization either at the nursery or by you. Blueberries need acidic soil at a pH level of about 4.5-5. If you used a regular high nitrogen fertilizer, it would be terrible for the plant and the leaves can get "burnt" from the fertilizer. Secondly, blueberries like ...


6

tomato blossom end rot is caused (generally) by a lack of calcium, sound like you are amending the soil, but in my area, The Great Basin the lack of calcium is caused by too much limestone clay, causing the soil to be so basic that the calcium isn't available (ie too much calcium means too little available to the plant) introduction of organic matter ...


6

This is called mycelium. It's a fungus that breaks down organic material. You'll find it on bits of wood buried in the soil, on rotting straw or woody bits in compost heaps, on leafmould and manure in the soil. They are not harmful and these organisms play a vital part in the ecosystem in breaking down material so plants can use it. It's a good thing when ...


6

There are many possible types of fungi or slime mould that this could be but the cause and treatment are the same. The source is wood which is part of a soil mix that has been inadequately composted or sterilized. The culprit is eating the woody bits in the soil. You cannot control this just by removing the soil as it will be found throughout the soil. ...


6

As you're not in the States, you won't have a 'phytosanitary seller'. This is commonly known as brown rot in the UK, and is pretty common - sets in usually as a secondary infection following damage to the fruits, usually from plum moth or birds pecking at them. Select one of the less affected fruits, cut it in half and see if you can find a sort of tunnel ...


6

Scale infestation - brown scale in fact, not that it matters. If you've got some rubbing alcohol or some methylated spirits, dip a cotton bud (Q tip) in and rub off the scale from the stems, being careful not to douse the stems or leaves in the spirit solution. The immature ones on the back of the leaves (paler, smaller) are susceptible to oil sprays such as ...


5

Blossom End Rot is caused by calcium deficiency -- you need to figure out the mechanism that caused the deficiency. It's a physiological problem resulting from the plant's inability to move calcium where it is needed. Have you done a soil test? Does your soil have enough calcium? Do you have too much potassium? (K interferes with Ca uptake.) Is your pH in ...


5

Although myself, I buy seed potatoes from a garden centre, I know a lot of seasoned gardeners who buy them from the local food store and, after chitting them, if they are larger than a hen's egg, cut them in half. I would think that the chances of their being diseased or of rotting are minimal. If you want to play it safe, you could let the cut ends dry for ...


5

Unfortunately, there is no known cure or treatment for a tree infected with this pathogen, which appears to be a strain of the fungus Fungus oxysporum. It is thought to spread to other palms on the wind and on pruning tools: • Infected palms die quickly, often within a few months of the initial symptoms. • There is no cure once a palm is infected, ...


5

Pretty sure that's Peach Leaf Curl. My tree's were hit by that pretty bad this last year. I spoke with a few people and from what I understand the solution is to apply a fungicide in either late fall (when most of the leaves are gone) or early spring (when they are budding). Something like this I sprayed my tree's down but I haven't had a chance to see ...


5

The last picture clinches it - it's undoubtedly scale. Scale is really hard to get rid of entirely. For most of the lifecycle it's very tiny and impossible to spot all of. It spreads to other plants. It leaves a sticky residue underneath the plant that's hard to remove. So... consider tossing the plant. You can slow it down a lot with organic sprays, ...


5

You have a little zoo under those leaves. The flying white insects are white fly. The long curly lines on the leaf are leaf miners and I think you have spider mite damage too judging by the stippling of yellow areas where the plant juices have been removed by insect activity. You could do nothing as you only want the beans to harvest or spray a mixture of ...


5

Look at the stem, down near the base. Do you see some distinctive brown-orange sawdust-like material? If so, that's called frass, and your plant is being destroyed by one or more squash vine borers. The wikipedia article is really good, and shows pictures (at the bottom) of what to look for. We've tried killing the grubs in the stem, with a hatpin and ...


5

Water. Too much water. It's soaked it all up and is rotting. Succulents kept indoors should be left unwatered and in the best sunlight available. You should really only water once a month or "eyeball it". When the plant starts to shrivel a bit, that's when it needs water. succulents store water in their leaves. They will literally use it up before ...


5

That is a bad case of spider mites. Check the link to a similar question. The good news is that you can control the situation easily and safely with soap and water and a cloth. Mix up a solution of a teaspoon of dish soap to a quart of water and stir. Soak the cloth in the solution and wipe down every surface of the plant, top and bottom, stems, ...


5

This is a dwarf Alberta spruce (Picea glauca conica). They grow slowly and burn easily if sited so they are exposed to cold winter winds. Sadly almost all of eastern North America was subject to very cold temperatures in the winter of 2013-2014. Your spruce looks a lot better than many I have seen. Even my dwarf white pine suffered burn on the south side ...



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