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-1

There are pots for indoor plants, they don't have a hole at the bottom and can be put on a desk. When planting in such a pot you have to put something on the bottom to provide a space for any exess water - I use pieces of broken ceramic pots (many garden centres give them for free) and/or pebbles.


4

I assume that you yourself will be the only one watering the plant. Most people use a saucer under the pot (without gravel) and avoid too much water build up by watering the plant only as needed. If you do over water the plant you can carefully empty the saucer or leave it until the excess has soaked into the soil (it's very unlikely that you will get ...


6

Well, basically, the perched table is the saturation point, where the capillary action in the soil is canceled out by the force of gravity. Every type of growing media has a different perched table. Capillary action will pull water up from a certain point, and below that point, gravity keeps the water from moving up. The size of the container does not affect ...


4

The first two answers tell you most everything you need to know, but from reading your question, you seem to be asking, if you could work out what size pot the plant will eventually need, you could maybe use that initially. The reason you don't is that you'll have a small rootball (presumably) surrounded by a large area of compost which will be more or ...


5

I think there is no easy rules beyond knowing the size of the adult plant. However, there are rules that can help you know when you have to change the pot with a larger one. If you can see many roots coming out of the drainage holes of pots. If the soil dries out very soon. If the plant has stopped growing and you know for sure that can become larger. ...


4

Firstly, this varies so much between different species that you could almost ask a separate question for each one (for instance, most cacti like abnormally tiny pots, while most vegetables like huge pots) but there are some good 'rules of thumb' you might like to know. First, pots generally come in sizes, and you generally want to go one size up when ...


3

I currently live in a condominium (on the second floor!). I own about a dozen citrus of different varieties, most small. Some live indoors and some live outside on my patio (except for really hard winter nights when I bring everything in). Here are some observations (sorry about length): Light-stressed citrus tend to compensate by growing very large ...



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