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1

I dug a oak up 5 years ago and placed it in a gallon size container and have had much success keeping it at its original height.(2 foot tall for 5 years). This spring I took it out of the one gallon and trimmed 1/3 of the rootball off, and placed it in a larger 5 gallon container. One month later and we have leaves! Relived that it took to the new container ...


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That picture shows what looks remarkably like a chafer grub, commonest in lawns, but also found in borders and vegetable beds, where it particularly likes root crops. Japanese beetle grubs are similar, but have, if you look closely, a sort of hairy spine - small, fine hairs that stick up, which I cannot see in the picture, so closer examination would be good ...


2

Grubs like the one you've pictured feed on plant roots. If there are a lot of them, then yes, they are doing damage. You may just not be noticing it yet. The worst part is they will eventually pupate into adult beetles, and those will work on damaging the above-ground parts of your plants. If they are Japanese Beetles (hard to say without more info but the ...


1

In my experience, the grubs will not be a problem in the veggie garden. That said, once they go through metamorphosis, they very well may damage your plants. So, when I loosen the soil in my veggie garden in the spring, I leave the grubs on the surface for the birds to get. As for your potted orange, what do you mean when you say it is totally infested? How ...


1

Clear pots can be great for plants, especially transplants. Plants vary a lot, but in general, the roots reach the edge of a clear container, feel the sun, and stop growing. This prevents them from getting root bound. Once transplanted into the ground the root start growing with a minimum of transplant shock. Broccoli is an example of a traditionally ...


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Flotech has a guide on their site for sizing fountain pumps, which mentions : Step Two - Look for the maximum head height rating This is how high (vertically) the pump can lift the water. Water pumped to its maximum height by a given pump doesn't necessarily mean the flow will be very strong at that maximum height. In fact, it might be only a trickle. ...


2

I've seen many citrus trees in pots. In fact where I live that is all I see since they'd have to come inside during the winter. I'd think that the trees would do fine in a pot. If you get a decent size pot they will grow to fill that pot. I'm not sure what you mean by stunted by being in a pot. The tree size will be limited because of the pot, but if ...


3

Yes, there is a reason, and its a pretty obvious one. Holes in the bottom of the pot ensure that no water is left sitting at the bottom - holes in the side, even if you get really close to the base, will inevitably leave a millimetre or so undrained. You could probably get round that by using horticultural grit or gravel at the bottom of the pot though, it ...



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