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15

Quite possibly, although there are two explanations I can think of. Each trap has some hairs on the inside (typically three on each side of the trap, but it does vary). A single touch to a hair is insufficient — there have to be two touches within about 20 seconds. The second touch can be to the same hair or a different hair. This behavior is ...


11

Of course it is difficult to know for sure, but it sounds like your general care is "the right type of thing". Yes only use distilled water. Don't use "any old bottled water", mineral water, well water, or tap water. Rain water is generally considered acceptable but you might to avoid it if you have a lot of pollution in your area. Pollution generally ...


8

As far as I know, it won't digest live plant matter. Venus flytraps secrete the enzymes phosphatase, proteinase, nuclease and amylase. These enzymes target insect prey, which have high levels of protein. When a leaf closes on a bug, it (the bug) will often secrete chemicals such as uric acid. Otherwise, the leaf should soon reopen. You don't generally prune ...


5

It sounds like humidity is the problem. If I understand correctly, you are growing it in a pot in a window sill? In non-tropical climates, I have only ever seen Nepenthes growing in tropical greenhouses (I find they are common plants in public tropical greenhouses in both the US and UK). In the days when I grew CPs (Carnivorous Plants) myself, I never ...


5

It is clearly an older trap that has gone into an inactive state purely for photosynthesis. It is easy to tell from the outward bend of the sides of the trap and the hairs pointing outward. The traps with the hairs pointed inward and the inward curve are active. They open like this when old, so the trap has more exposure to light instead of blocking the ...


5

Your plant doesn't look like it's happy in the conditions it is growing in. For example, it definitely doesn't look like it is getting enough light. Here are some tips for coaxing your plant back into healthy condition. Basically it needs at least 4 hours of sun per day, well drained but moist growing conditions, and it is recommended to water it with ...


4

My experience is limited to Venus flytrap plants in Scotland, but I found that through the winter the plants growth slowed right down along with the lack of insects. There were a few bugs that we fed to the plants, but only around one a month, and the plants just picked up their activity in the spring as the insects started to increase in numbers.


4

Never let a nepenthes sit in water it will kill the plant I use a small terrarium for my nepenthes with a sphagnum moss and foam mix although many other pourous draining soils with lots of air spaces works great. This soil type has helped has kept my ventricosa x Mira hybrid alive for years and if yours is a highland species it needs a nightly tempurature ...


4

Nepenthes can be grown as windowsill plants as long as adequate conditions are provided. There are two main divisions for nepenthes, highland and lowland with some groups in between. Lowlanders tend to need high temperatures and very high humidity (imagine a rain forest). Highlanders need lower temperatures and usually do not require as much humidity (think ...


3

I'm going to go against the grain here, and say NO. I don't know what the lowest TDS of the water in your area is (average is 350ppm -- http://www.tdsmeter.com/education?id=0018), but 350ppm is entirely too high for VFTs. A VFT requires 50ppm or lower of TDS (http://venusflytrap.info/gloss-tds.html). If your water is above this, regardless of chlorine or ...


3

The plant in the above sketch does not exist. If you are looking for a carnivorous plant species, you will find it here. No stemmed plant has a large non-reproductive body at the apex of the main stem. You may have seen a small pitcher plant vine with only one flower.


3

First of all, you have a nice Nepenthes! Its a mythic plant :) It looks like a Nepenthes ventrata, or a hybrid. It's not a Nepenthes ampullaria for sure. Your plant needs rain or demineralized water Water the plant when the surface of the soil is a LITTLE BIT dry. Your plant needs relative humidity of 70% or more. Your plant needs a 4-5°C temperature ...


2

I got some advice from a colleague, that says he kept one alive for 4 years. He said: It needs more than just get "watered"; It needs to "stand in water". He watered his everyday. He tried to use mostly distilled water, as his tap water contained too much lime, which eventually would clog the roots. (I will not waste my money on buying distilled water ...


2

If they get too much Nitrogen, they will stop killing to get protein/Nitrogen.


2

The fertiliser was a huge mistake, carnivorous plants hate root nutrients, so if you added any fertiliser, it would have to be extremely diluted. Water it more often, try misting it, too, with a cleaned spray-bottle. Only use pure water; don't use tap water because it will kill the plant.


2

Not all Nepenthes will work as house plants. I have tried N. alata with no luck. N. miranda is a hybrid that I have had good luck with. I bought it at Lowest as an adult larger plant 5 years ago. It is a fussy plant as far as repotting. Taking several months to start growing well. Despite this it gets used to normal New England conditions. I grow it in a ...


2

Pitchers tend to die much earlier than leaves. I know this from personal experience. I've had pitchers die on leaves which last a month or more afterwards. I usually cut the pitchers off once they die (mostly because I think it looks better). On another note, you do not need a terrarium to grow nepenthes. I have a N. maxima which I have been growing as a ...


2

For me, the youngest traps snap closed the best, but the older traps become convex and seem to loose interest in feeding. I have a lot of Venus Flytraps which I grew from seed. It is fun to see the differences between seed grown plants. You said you are using "purified water". You should be using distilled water since "purified" can mean many things, for ...


2

I think you are following the proper way of growing venus fly trap. The first year i started to grow venus fly traps it happened the same to me, traps were lazy and they began to close very slowly, next year I repotted my plant 50% turf 50% perlite and they got better, anyway I needed another year to start to have nice plants again. Did you try to ...


2

You can grow carnivorous plants (CPs) without any bugs. Think of the bugs as a dietary supplement. If you're growing local plants, then indoor climates might still pose problems. I don't know your outside climate or if you have a/c, but carnivorous plants generally like moist bog ground. That may require frequent watering in a dry indoor climate. Although ...


1

No and no, unfortunately. Chlorine will boil out in a few hours but fluoride needs a carbon filter. There are other dissolved salts in most tap water that are fine for consumption but not good for a venus fly trap. If your filtration plant uses chloramine you could boil the water all day and there would still be a detectable level of chloramine in the ...


1

I'm assuming by "baddies" you mean intentionally added chemicals such as chlorine. Boiling it - or just leaving it out for a day or so - will remove/reduce the chlorine content of water but I don't think it does anything for the fluoride content. There are some filtration methods that can be used to remove fluoride but I'm not sure it's worthwhile to do ...


1

Your problem could be in giving it distilled water, which has a ph of 7. The pH of rain varies, especially due to its origin. On America's East Coast, rain that is derived from the Atlantic Ocean typically has a pH of 5.0-5.6; rain that comes across the continental from the west has a pH of 3.8-4.8; and local thunderstorms can have a pH as low as 2.0. ...


1

Venus fly traps have trigger hairs (which are visible to the naked eye) inside their mouths. In order to trigger their mouths to shut, the prey (or yourself) must trigger two or more hairs within a certain small time frame (35 seconds). If the hairs aren't continually triggered after the mouth has shut, then the mouth will open back up after a short while. ...


1

You don't have to feed carnivorous plants at all and for the winter they will just slow growth and eat less but for good health you will need to decrease the temp of the plants if it is a flytrap or pitcher plant but tropical sundews don't need any change nor do nepenthes aka tropical pitcher plants or the kings at carnivorous plants. Nepenthes can live ...


1

I love the idea of carnivorous plants for indoor pest control... all of the temperate carnivorous plants that I am aware of require a winter dormancy... they will probably survive for a couple of years without this dormancy, but they wont really thrive, sarracenia leaves can last for 2-3 years; so probably that long at least before it withers away. during ...



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