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15

Oh yes, they will. I always do this and one or two bunches from the store is enough to produce green onions for an average household for a few months. While the scallions are refrigerated in the store, I try to chop off the bulbs as soon as I get home and plant them. However, a day or two's delay shouldn't matter. Onions are generally very easy to grow ...


8

Yes, I should think so, but I suppose the success rate would vary depending on what kind of bulb it is. Bulbs contain the food or nutrients to keep it alive while it is dormant through the winter. Sixty days in the fridge is shorter than an outdoor overwintering and definitely cool enough so they should be fine. If the bulb is too squishy it might have ...


8

The outer layers are thick, dry and dark brown. Should I peel them away, or is there reason to believe they may be protecting the healthy part of the bulb? Only remove them if they are hanging loose from the bulbs. The ones wrapped around the bulbs are protective and should not be removed. The tops are shriveled, but I can see some green ...


8

Couple of things - when you bought your hyacinth bulb, was it a prepared, pre treated one, sold specially for growing indoors? Or was it just an ordinary outdoor one? It's usual to buy a prepared one for indoor growing, to ensure they flower in late winter rather than waiting for late spring, as they naturally do, so the fact yours has already finished ...


7

Given that it grows on poor soils, is shallowly planted, is evergreen (since it stays green this time of year), and has a white easter lily like bloom. I would guess it is Madonna Lily (Lilium candidum) (USDA zone 4-5). Photo of Lilium candidum at VanDusen Botanical Garden, taken July 2005 by Stan Shebs. A photo of madonna lily's evergreen basal growth, ...


7

Full sized onions should be removed from the ground, with as much of their wrappers left intact as possible, as soon as they're ready to be harvested. Then either: Allowed to dry in a dry shady area for a day, then used immediately. Hung to air dry (cured) for 2 to 3 weeks in a dry shady area with good air circulation until they dry out. To maximise their ...


7

I haven't found myself in this situation, so I can's speak from experience, but following on from bstpierre's advice, rather than discard those that have sprouted, I would try storing them as suggested below, and then plant them as soon as the ground is workable in the spring: Store bulbs in a dry place If the bulbs are in a plastic bag, the first ...


7

I have done this successfully several times, but in a warmer zone (Lancaster, PA, zone 6b). I put the bulbs in a 33 degree F. refrigerator for about 2 weeks first, reasoning that it would prepare them for the cold (~15-20 deg. F. at the time). They all survived, each time. Things to note: If you use the fridge, make sure there is no fruit in it, or the ...


7

It's possible they may do nothing at all ever, but you should plant them immediately anyway - they may put out some leaves which will at least enable them to garner food supplies for possible flowering next year and gives them a bit of a chance of surviving. There is nothing to be gained by waiting until this fall, they'll likely shrivel and dry out by then. ...


7

There's nothing you can do - we're in the same boat here in the UK, lots of people saying their new bulb plantings are showing growth already, although more mature plantings aren't. The cause is fluctuating weather conditions - cooler weather when planted, with warmer weather arriving a few weeks later, which starts the growth cycle. Usually its the ...


6

Without knowing what bulbs you have, I can only give general advice: Remove and discard any that have sprouted. Store the bag in a cool, dry, dark place over the winter. Check regularly and remove any bulbs that have sprouted or are rotting. You might have some that are viable next spring.


6

Have you had unseasonably warm weather in the past few weeks? (we have down here in Texas). Unseasonably warm weather will often 'trick' plants into producing new leaves and/or flowers early. The real problem occurs if there's a frost which kills new buds/growth (I suspect daffodils are less prone to that than, say, fruit trees).


6

Wait until the foliage yellows, then remove the plants from the pots, trim off all the tops and roots. Plant them 4-6" deep if you have a sandy soil, slightly more shallow if you have clay. Cover the soil with 1" of a straw-type mulch and tamp down. It should then need no further attention until spring.


6

Yes, cold paired with no snow cover is hard on top growth, but garlic cloves will survive the winter in zone 6b (where I am also, incidentally). In my area, it's common for the top growth to die back completely during winter, and come back in the spring.


6

Plant them as is, do not try to mend the bulbs. At best the bulb just needs some moisture from the surrounding soil. At worst, the bulb simply won't grow. If you are concerned about disease, you can throw the sad looking ones out, but don't bother trying to mend them, you'll do more harm than good.


6

On the assumption you mean indoors in the sun, it would be best if it wasn't in full, hot sun all day because it might affect the roots - the glass may magnify the sun's rays and cause burning, and will certainly cause a fair amount of condensation on the glass under the bulb. A little sun is fine though, and yes, you can and should leave it as it is in its ...


5

Replant it roots down and it might stage a comeback. The stem will come about.


5

The grape like fruits are the seed pods. Yes, you can grow snowdrops from seed, but for most bulbs it will take 2-4 years from seed to bulb. Given how many seeds each one can produce this is easily your fastest way. Failing that, however, pruning off the seed pods/ flowers ASAP means that the plant pushes more energy into growing the bulb. Now, some ...


5

My amaryllis bulb is about 26 years old and blooms twice every year without fail. I have it in an east facing window, and I water it as and when I remember! I feed it with Gro-more twice a year as the main stalk starts to show (only adding to one watering each blossoming time). I honestly do not pamper this bulb, never take it out of the window (even in ...


5

Last year, I stored tulips and daffodils in the fridge from September until January. I only got one daffodil to bloom (but the weather was VERY flip-floppy last year which confused my entire garden). However, the tulips all bloomed incredibly (it was perfect temperatures for them when they were busy blooming). My conclusion is that your bulbs will be fine. ...


5

The leaves of Armenian grape hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum) normally emerge in the fall. This species includes many of the modern named varieties. Common grape hyacinth (Muscari botryoides) consistantly sends up leaves in the fall in Washington State, but does this less often in other areas, like Minnesota. Once grape hyacinths go dormant in the late spring ...


5

Tulips do best when planted deep, like 8 inches, for best perennialization. Daffodils, on the other hand, will spread much faster when planted at 3-4" deep. Now, this is for the purpose of perennialization, to make sure the plants return each year. Bulbs need root space as much as other plants, long term. If it's a one season thing you are doing, They will ...


5

Like you said, flowers for cross-pollination don't always coincide. Here's how to harvest and save pollen. After the flower is open, the anthers have burst/opened, and you can see mature grains of pollen, take a fine brush, and gently remove some of the pollen and put it onto a white sheet of paper. You can use pollen from more than one flower, as long as ...


5

From the daylilies faq When is the right time to plant daylilies? North In the North, spring planting is normally preferred. Fall planting in colder climates can prove fatal for daylilies because they often do not have adequate time to form new roots and to begin to anchor themselves before winter comes. Experienced gardeners, however, can ...


4

I would re-pot it and fertilize it and keep it moist for a while, and if nothing happened in a couple of months, I would get rid of it.


4

The two areas have pretty much the same soil and water. The newer area might have slightly better soil in so far as it has been turned over more recently and had some potting soil that came with the bulbs worked into it as part of planting the new bulbs. The new area also gets a little more direct sunlight in the morning, and more shade in the afternoon. ...


4

I had a friend tell me that I could put about the last 2 inches of green onions in a shot glass or other small glass, fill it with water (being sure to leave to top sticking out), then stick it in my window sill so it gets a lot of sun, and they will re-grow! You just have to keep an eye on the amount of water so it doesn't dry up. I've been doing it for the ...


4

I believe you will find "tender bulbs" are easier (less work) to grow indoors than "hardy bulbs", though both types can be grown indoors. Therefore given the choice between Rain Lily (tender bulb) and Hyacinth (hardy bulb) I would go with the Rain Lily. Hippeastrum is another tender bulb you may want to look at, it's a "popular" indoor flowering (bulb) ...


4

The cooling period depends on if we're talking "hardy" bulbs or "tender" bulbs (or "semi-tender" bulbs). Hardy bulbs require a cooling period of 40°F (4°C) or below. Most can withstand weeks of sub-freezing temperatures. Crocuses, Daffodils, Scilla, Tulips, etc can all be left in the ground here (USDA Hardiness Zone 6a) and we get below 0°F ...


4

With good soil and a sunny location and without lily beetles attacking from scale to a small flower could be three to five years. Edit: @jmusser asks about a timeline for growth rates. From here Seed - immediate epigeal germination[130]. Sow thinly in pots from late winter to early spring in a cold frame. Should germinate in 2 - 4 weeks[163]. Great ...



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