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11

Oh yes, they will. I always do this and one or two bunches from the store is enough to produce green onions for an average household for a few months. While the scallions are refrigerated in the store, I try to chop off the bulbs as soon as I get home and plant them. However, a day or two's delay shouldn't matter. Onions are generally very easy to grow ...


7

Yes, I should think so, but I suppose the success rate would vary depending on what kind of bulb it is. Bulbs contain the food or nutrients to keep it alive while it is dormant through the winter. Sixty days in the fridge is shorter than an outdoor overwintering and definitely cool enough so they should be fine. If the bulb is too squishy it might have ...


7

Full sized onions should be removed from the ground, with as much of their wrappers left intact as possible, as soon as they're ready to be harvested. Then either: Allowed to dry in a dry shady area for a day, then used immediately. Hung to air dry (cured) for 2 to 3 weeks in a dry shady area with good air circulation until they dry out. To maximise their ...


6

Given that it grows on poor soils, is shallowly planted, is evergreen (since it stays green this time of year), and has a white easter lily like bloom. I would guess it is Madonna Lily (Lilium candidum) (USDA zone 4-5). Photo of Lilium candidum at VanDusen Botanical Garden, taken July 2005 by Stan Shebs. A photo of madonna lily's evergreen basal growth, ...


6

I haven't found myself in this situation, so I can's speak from experience, but following on from bstpierre's advice, rather than discard those that have sprouted, I would try storing them as suggested below, and then plant them as soon as the ground is workable in the spring: Store bulbs in a dry place If the bulbs are in a plastic bag, the first ...


5

Wait until the foliage yellows, then remove the plants from the pots, trim off all the tops and roots. Plant them 4-6" deep if you have a sandy soil, slightly more shallow if you have clay. Cover the soil with 1" of a straw-type mulch and tamp down. It should then need no further attention until spring.


5

Without knowing what bulbs you have, I can only give general advice: Remove and discard any that have sprouted. Store the bag in a cool, dry, dark place over the winter. Check regularly and remove any bulbs that have sprouted or are rotting. You might have some that are viable next spring.


4

I believe you will find "tender bulbs" are easier (less work) to grow indoors than "hardy bulbs", though both types can be grown indoors. Therefore given the choice between Rain Lily (tender bulb) and Hyacinth (hardy bulb) I would go with the Rain Lily. Hippeastrum is another tender bulb you may want to look at, it's a "popular" indoor flowering (bulb) ...


4

Last year, I stored tulips and daffodils in the fridge from September until January. I only got one daffodil to bloom (but the weather was VERY flip-floppy last year which confused my entire garden). However, the tulips all bloomed incredibly (it was perfect temperatures for them when they were busy blooming). My conclusion is that your bulbs will be fine. ...


4

The leaves of Armenian grape hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum) normally emerge in the fall. This species includes many of the modern named varieties. Common grape hyacinth (Muscari botryoides) consistantly sends up leaves in the fall in Washington State, but does this less often in other areas, like Minnesota. Once grape hyacinths go dormant in the late spring ...


3

You should not have any difficulty growing hyacinths under the conditions you describe, although, as jmusser points out, you will not be able to make permanent residents of them.When I was a child, my mother successfully "forced" bowls of hyacinths (fooled them into thinking that winter was over and it was Spring and time to bloom) every year, so that they ...


3

The grape like fruits are the seed pods. Yes, you can grow snowdrops from seed, but for most bulbs it will take 2-4 years from seed to bulb. Given how many seeds each one can produce this is easily your fastest way. Failing that, however, pruning off the seed pods/ flowers ASAP means that the plant pushes more energy into growing the bulb. Now, some ...


3

Yes, they will be fine. As the energy of the plant was exhausted by producing the bud, it need to store the energy again in the coming year. If the deers didn't ate the whole lily and some leaves are still there, they can do photosynthesis thus storing the nutrient again. And when the next suitable season come, the flower will still bloom. After all, if ...


3

I'm guessing it's a blue-eyed grass (Sisyrinchium), but the blub-like thickening at the base doesn't look right, so perhaps it's something else in the iris family. [c.f Sisyrinchium bermudianum]


3

Have you had unseasonably warm weather in the past few weeks? (we have down here in Texas). Unseasonably warm weather will often 'trick' plants into producing new leaves and/or flowers early. The real problem occurs if there's a frost which kills new buds/growth (I suspect daffodils are less prone to that than, say, fruit trees).


3

I had a friend tell me that I could put about the last 2 inches of green onions in a shot glass or other small glass and fill it with water (being sure to leave to top sticking out) then stick in in my window sill so it gets a lot of sun and they will re grow! You just have to keep an eye on the amount of water so it doesnt dry up. Ive been doing it for the ...


3

Hardy bulbs, such as hyacinth, require a number of hours of cold in order to properly set blooms for the spring. If they are planted outdoors in a suitable climate, this happens naturally during the course of the fall and winter. If you want to have them bloom ahead of schedule in pots, you have to simulate this winter rest by "cold treating" them in some ...


2

The two areas have pretty much the same soil and water. The newer area might have slightly better soil in so far as it has been turned over more recently and had some potting soil that came with the bulbs worked into it as part of planting the new bulbs. The new area also gets a little more direct sunlight in the morning, and more shade in the afternoon. ...


2

The cooling period depends on if we're talking "hardy" bulbs or "tender" bulbs (or "semi-tender" bulbs). Hardy bulbs require a cooling period of 40°F (4°C) or below. Most can withstand weeks of sub-freezing temperatures. Crocuses, Daffodils, Scilla, Tulips, etc can all be left in the ground here (USDA Hardiness Zone 6a) and we get below 0°F ...


2

I had been trying to keep the water level covering the bottom 1/4" to 1/2" of the bulbs, but now that they're putting down roots, I'm aiming for just up to the bottom of the bulbs. Having the bulbs themselves constantly sitting in the water, even such a small amount is the most likely cause of the mold (IMHO). If it was me, I would: Very! ...


2

Whether the bulb is sprouted or not, the most important conditions for storing your bulbs are: dry and cold. The best for the specific summer bulb you mention is between 45-55°F (7-13°C). The cardboard box is perfect but I'd put some dry material over them to absorb ambient moisture.


2

Okay, here is my answer: 1) Yes it is normal. They often even stay above ground year round. Any dead or completely yellowed foliage can be removed at any time. 2) Splitting the clump and replanting in rich, well drained topsoil will encourage flowering. Try not to compact the soil, or let it become waterlogged. Also, I've found that mulching with any ...


2

I'm answering my own question as advised by @jmusser. I found out that this is a Iris X hollandica aka as Dutch Iris. I found this information here. (not a permanent link I suppose). Voila, the flower is open: Originally I asked about the identification because I wanted to know whether the plants growing in my garden are just almost dead leftovers of ...


2

Lemons need acid soil. Tulips prefer the soil slightly alkaline. If you still want to grow them here, Put 5" of good, slightly alkaline topsoil in a twelve inch deep pot. Then place the tulip bulbs right side up on the soil, and fill the pot the rest of the way up with the same soil. Then dig a hole and plant the whole thing level with the ground level. Then ...


2

Flowers do not need to bloom or be fertilized to do well. They do need good soil, light, and foliage. As long as the deer leave that alone the lilies will be fine. Some plants, like bromeliads, will flower and die so if you remove the flower bud it will last much longer than a plant in the wild. Plants expend an enormous amount of energy on producing ...


2

Plant them now. If they're sprouting, they're using their own stored energy to grow their leaves, so the more they use doing that, the less they'll have for putting out flowers in late winter or spring. They're probably not getting the water they need either, and that's also coming from what's stored in the bulb; once that runs out, they'll start to weaken ...


2

"It's now October and they're sprouting again!" -- as they should be. Most freesias are native to the hot dry summer, moist winter portions of South Africa. Freesias normal cycle is to go dormant during the summer and resprout when temperatures moderate and the rains finally return. They have summer dormancy period. I am not sure whether the bulbs need to ...


1

It'll probably grow new ones. I planted mine a week ago and they're nearly blooming! I've had our native ones indoors for months, trying to for them and the paperwhites have done more in a week than those others have in 2 months! It might be too hot inside for the native ones, paperwhites are from the Med so can tolerate the heat better I guess.


1

A quick bit of research suggests that you are probably in zone 8 which has a minimum temp of around 15F. Tulips and daffodils need about 40 days of weather below 45F in order to bloom well. OTOH amarylis, alliums, fresias and anemones should all do well without the kind of chilling we get in the north. I would find a good garden store and engage one of ...


1

Tulip growers will claim that all tulips are perennial in the right conditions. Planting them deep, up to 8" deep, seems to help as well. I have found that Darwin Hybrids are the best for my alkaline clay based soil in USDA zone 4. These "perennial" tulips are the result of crossing the old Darwin Tulips with Fosteriana Tulips, which grow wild. However, ...



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