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Is it possible to grow an Acacia variety in Ohio (zone 6)? I'd prefer to not grow them in a greenhouse, I'm looking for something that will survive the winter (even if I cover it all winter).

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Acacia is a huge genus and has many members many drought and cold hardy members. –  Grady Player Jul 13 '12 at 14:22
    
@GradyPlayer Can you suggest some what will weather the cold Ohio winters? From what I read, they (generally) need zone 8. kevinsky suggested two that may work. If you know of some, please make your reply a question so that I can upvote as needed. –  Some Free Mason Jul 13 '12 at 16:47
    
Yeah not sure on species names, you will probably need species from north America, as Australian and African species are almost all subtropical –  Grady Player Jul 13 '12 at 19:36
    
Looks like Acacia wrightii, Acacia gregii may be some of your better bets, I am trying to id one that is growing where I work in zone 6, but it may be a different but similar genus, it has a greatly expanded petiole, and diminished almost vestigial leaflets... –  Grady Player Jul 13 '12 at 20:45
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The hardiness of a plant is influenced by many factors some of which you can influence.

  • your local micro climate:

     - sheltered is good
     - warmer urban areas help
     - ideal soil conditions.  
     - Acacias do not seem to withstand heavy snow loads so plant accordingly.
    
  • Although the hardiest acacias I could find were good to zone 7 ish the latest USDA zone map shows a creep of warmer winter temperatures northward. I'm certainly seeing this where I live.

You could try these species:

This web site is for gardening enthusiasts who like to push the definition of plant hardiness and may be of interest. Or this botanical garden in Texas has acacia seed for sale.

I would try growing plants from seed rather than buying established plants and plant as many as your garden will fit.

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+1 thank you for the information. Maybe if I grow some close to the house and in an area that's blocked off (inner part of an 'L') I'll have a chance. I'll try the Pravissima seeds first. I would think that I could eventually get enough seeds by natural selection to make a go at it. –  Some Free Mason Jul 13 '12 at 12:52
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