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This vine is growing up around a sycamore tree in my yard. Mainly I am concerned that it is something that is toxic. Just want to make sure it isn't likely something that will make me break out in a rash before pulling it. I'm a little gun shy since my recent bout of poison ivy.

Maybe it is just the fact that the leaves themselves look like they have some kind of rash on them. =)

Oh. I probably should mention that the vines are central Texas. Might help on to ID them.

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3 Answers 3

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This is wild grape vine! The leaves of wild grape vary quite a bit, but this is one type. Look up Vitis mustangensis, Mustang Grape.

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Here's a link with some more info on them sbs.utexas.edu/bio406d/images/pics/vit/vitis_mustangensis.htm –  Brian Surowiec Jul 26 '12 at 4:39
    
Actually, that makes a lot of sense. Years ago I did have grapes growing nearby, but a plague of grasshoppers killed them. I guess nature finds a way.... –  JohnFx Jul 26 '12 at 14:05

It does not look like any poison ivy, oak, or sumac variant that I've ever seen. They usually have leaves that grow in a trio. Have you ever seen it seed/fruit? I'm placing a guess that it's a Manroot vine. I'm not a botanist so it might be worthwhile to put on some gloves, put a cutting in a plastic bag, and check with a local nursery.

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Never seen fruit on it, and I think I would have noticed those giant spiky fruits. –  JohnFx Jun 17 '12 at 4:12

Looks like Ampelopsis brevipedunculata 'Elegans'.

http://www.yourgardenshow.com/plants/6810-Ampelopsis-brevipedunculata-Elegans-

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I believe this is a correct identification, but "Looks like ..." type identifications without a discussion of identifying features are not really that helpful and lead occasionally to popular mis-identifications. So you might want to list the characteristics of the pictured plant that mark it as Ampelopsis brevipedunculata i.e. its leaf shape with notable leaf shape variation (bottom photo), it is woody, has branched tendrils, grows in the shade, etc. You may also want to explain why the mottling that characterizes 'Elegans' is so different in the above photo (it's growing in the shade). –  Eric Nitardy Jun 20 '12 at 14:42

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